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Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery.

Suneelkumar C, Datta K, Srinivasan MR, Kumar ST - J Conserv Dent (2008)

Bottom Line: They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility.Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and beta -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios.Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and beta -tricalcium phosphate (beta -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and beta -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium phosphate as a bone substitute in periapical surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

6 months' follow-up
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Figure 0003: 6 months' follow-up

Mentions: The patient was recalled the following day. Chemomechanical preparation was completed, and an intracanal medication of calcium hydroxide was given. In spite of repeated intracanal medication, the symptoms persisted and hence a periapical surgery was planned. Bilateral infra-alveolar block was administered, and a full-thickness mucoperiosteal flap was elevated. The lesion measuring 15×10 mm was curetted. The root canal was obturated with zinc oxide eugenol sealer and gutta-percha by lateral condensation. Root end resection was done. Retro-preparation was done using ultrasonic tips and was restored with type II glass ionomer cement. The periapical wound was flushed with saline. Biphasic calcium phosphate was mixed with saline to form a thick paste and carried to the periapex with an amalgam carrier and gently condensed into the periapical bone cavity. The flap was repositioned and sutured in place with a 3.0 black silk. An immediate postoperative radiograph was taken [Figure 1B]. Sutures were removed after 1 week. The patient was reviewed periodically. Density of the bone graft material decreased in size, as seen by the change in its radiopacity. On review at the end of 6 months, the bone graft was seen to be replaced with normal trabecular pattern of the bone [Figure 1C].


Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery.

Suneelkumar C, Datta K, Srinivasan MR, Kumar ST - J Conserv Dent (2008)

6 months' follow-up
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2813096&req=5

Figure 0003: 6 months' follow-up
Mentions: The patient was recalled the following day. Chemomechanical preparation was completed, and an intracanal medication of calcium hydroxide was given. In spite of repeated intracanal medication, the symptoms persisted and hence a periapical surgery was planned. Bilateral infra-alveolar block was administered, and a full-thickness mucoperiosteal flap was elevated. The lesion measuring 15×10 mm was curetted. The root canal was obturated with zinc oxide eugenol sealer and gutta-percha by lateral condensation. Root end resection was done. Retro-preparation was done using ultrasonic tips and was restored with type II glass ionomer cement. The periapical wound was flushed with saline. Biphasic calcium phosphate was mixed with saline to form a thick paste and carried to the periapex with an amalgam carrier and gently condensed into the periapical bone cavity. The flap was repositioned and sutured in place with a 3.0 black silk. An immediate postoperative radiograph was taken [Figure 1B]. Sutures were removed after 1 week. The patient was reviewed periodically. Density of the bone graft material decreased in size, as seen by the change in its radiopacity. On review at the end of 6 months, the bone graft was seen to be replaced with normal trabecular pattern of the bone [Figure 1C].

Bottom Line: They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility.Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and beta -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios.Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and beta -tricalcium phosphate (beta -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and beta -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium phosphate as a bone substitute in periapical surgery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus