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Accurate analysis of tumor margins using a fluorescent pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP).

Segala J, Engelman DM, Reshetnyak YK, Andreev OA - Int J Mol Sci (2009)

Bottom Line: The recurrence of certain cancers remains quite high due to either incomplete surgical removal of the primary tumor or the presence of small metastases that are invisible to the surgeon.Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging might improve surgical outcomes by providing sensitive, specific, and real-time visualization of normal and diseased tissues if agents can be found that discriminate between normal and diseased tissue and define tumor margins.The approach is tested in vivo by co-localization of GFP-tumors and NIR emission from the fluorescently labeled pHLIP, and it is found that boundaries are accurately reported and that sub-millimeter masses can be detected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physics Department, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA. segalaj@egr.uri.edu

ABSTRACT
The recurrence of certain cancers remains quite high due to either incomplete surgical removal of the primary tumor or the presence of small metastases that are invisible to the surgeon. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging might improve surgical outcomes by providing sensitive, specific, and real-time visualization of normal and diseased tissues if agents can be found that discriminate between normal and diseased tissue and define tumor margins. We have developed a new approach for revealing tumor borders by using NIR fluorescently labeled pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP) and have created a computational program for the quantitative assessment of tumor boundaries. The approach is tested in vivo by co-localization of GFP-tumors and NIR emission from the fluorescently labeled pHLIP, and it is found that boundaries are accurately reported and that sub-millimeter masses can be detected.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The output window of the EdgeFinder program is presented. It contains the original GFP and NIR fluorescence (CY) images, and processed images with computed tumor borders. Blue and red colors are used to show tumor borders calculated from the NIR and GFP fluorescence images, respectively.
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f3-ijms-10-03478: The output window of the EdgeFinder program is presented. It contains the original GFP and NIR fluorescence (CY) images, and processed images with computed tumor borders. Blue and red colors are used to show tumor borders calculated from the NIR and GFP fluorescence images, respectively.

Mentions: We applied the EdgeFinder algorithm for the analysis of the GFP and NIR Cy5.5 fluorescent images presented in Figure 1g and 1h. The program output window is presented in Figure 3, where the tumor borders calculated from the NIR Cy5.5-pHLIP and GFP-fluorescence images are shown as blue and red lines, respectively. Tumor borders established from the GFP and NIR images are in excellent agreement with each other. We explored how well the tumor was removed during surgery. The GFP and NIR fluorescence of a tumor are overlaid with a photo of the tumor site and presented in Figure 4a and b. We performed “surgery” and removed the main mass of the tumor, but some traces, invisible to the naked eye, could be visualized by GFP fluorescence (Figure 4d). The same spots were seen using the pHLIP labeling with NIR settings (Figure 4c).


Accurate analysis of tumor margins using a fluorescent pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP).

Segala J, Engelman DM, Reshetnyak YK, Andreev OA - Int J Mol Sci (2009)

The output window of the EdgeFinder program is presented. It contains the original GFP and NIR fluorescence (CY) images, and processed images with computed tumor borders. Blue and red colors are used to show tumor borders calculated from the NIR and GFP fluorescence images, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2812834&req=5

f3-ijms-10-03478: The output window of the EdgeFinder program is presented. It contains the original GFP and NIR fluorescence (CY) images, and processed images with computed tumor borders. Blue and red colors are used to show tumor borders calculated from the NIR and GFP fluorescence images, respectively.
Mentions: We applied the EdgeFinder algorithm for the analysis of the GFP and NIR Cy5.5 fluorescent images presented in Figure 1g and 1h. The program output window is presented in Figure 3, where the tumor borders calculated from the NIR Cy5.5-pHLIP and GFP-fluorescence images are shown as blue and red lines, respectively. Tumor borders established from the GFP and NIR images are in excellent agreement with each other. We explored how well the tumor was removed during surgery. The GFP and NIR fluorescence of a tumor are overlaid with a photo of the tumor site and presented in Figure 4a and b. We performed “surgery” and removed the main mass of the tumor, but some traces, invisible to the naked eye, could be visualized by GFP fluorescence (Figure 4d). The same spots were seen using the pHLIP labeling with NIR settings (Figure 4c).

Bottom Line: The recurrence of certain cancers remains quite high due to either incomplete surgical removal of the primary tumor or the presence of small metastases that are invisible to the surgeon.Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging might improve surgical outcomes by providing sensitive, specific, and real-time visualization of normal and diseased tissues if agents can be found that discriminate between normal and diseased tissue and define tumor margins.The approach is tested in vivo by co-localization of GFP-tumors and NIR emission from the fluorescently labeled pHLIP, and it is found that boundaries are accurately reported and that sub-millimeter masses can be detected.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physics Department, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881, USA. segalaj@egr.uri.edu

ABSTRACT
The recurrence of certain cancers remains quite high due to either incomplete surgical removal of the primary tumor or the presence of small metastases that are invisible to the surgeon. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging might improve surgical outcomes by providing sensitive, specific, and real-time visualization of normal and diseased tissues if agents can be found that discriminate between normal and diseased tissue and define tumor margins. We have developed a new approach for revealing tumor borders by using NIR fluorescently labeled pH Low Insertion Peptide (pHLIP) and have created a computational program for the quantitative assessment of tumor boundaries. The approach is tested in vivo by co-localization of GFP-tumors and NIR emission from the fluorescently labeled pHLIP, and it is found that boundaries are accurately reported and that sub-millimeter masses can be detected.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus