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Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease beginning in childhood.

Hong YM - Korean Circ J (2010)

Bottom Line: The early stage and progression of atherosclerosis in youth are influenced by risk factors that include obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking, and by the presence of specific diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and Kawasaki disease (KD).The existing evidence indicates that primary prevention of atherosclerotic disease should begin in childhood.Identification of children at risk for atherosclerosis may allow early intervention to decrease the atherosclerotic process, thereby preventing or delaying CVD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Although the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, appear from middle age, the process of atherosclerosis can begin early in childhood. The early stage and progression of atherosclerosis in youth are influenced by risk factors that include obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking, and by the presence of specific diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and Kawasaki disease (KD). The existing evidence indicates that primary prevention of atherosclerotic disease should begin in childhood. Identification of children at risk for atherosclerosis may allow early intervention to decrease the atherosclerotic process, thereby preventing or delaying CVD. This review will describe the origin and progression of atherosclerosis in childhood, and the identification and management of known risk factors for atherosclerotic CVD in children and young adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Natural history of atherosclerosis.
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Figure 1: Natural history of atherosclerosis.

Mentions: Atherosclerosis begins in childhood as an accumulation of fatty streaks-lipid-engorged macrophages (foam cells) and T lymphocytes in the intima of the arteries. Fatty streaks may or may not progress, and may regress. In some people, lipid accumulation is more pronounced with time, and the accumulated lipid becomes covered by a fibromuscular cap to form what is termed a fibrous plaque. Temporally, between the fatty streak and the fibrous plaque, transitional stages of atherosclerosis exist that are not identifiable by gross examination alone. With time, fibrous plaques enlarge and undergo calcification, hemorrhage, ulceration or rupture, and thrombosis. Thrombotic occlusion precipitates clinical disease such as myocardial infarction, stroke, or gangrene depending on which artery is affected (Fig. 1).1)


Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease beginning in childhood.

Hong YM - Korean Circ J (2010)

Natural history of atherosclerosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2812791&req=5

Figure 1: Natural history of atherosclerosis.
Mentions: Atherosclerosis begins in childhood as an accumulation of fatty streaks-lipid-engorged macrophages (foam cells) and T lymphocytes in the intima of the arteries. Fatty streaks may or may not progress, and may regress. In some people, lipid accumulation is more pronounced with time, and the accumulated lipid becomes covered by a fibromuscular cap to form what is termed a fibrous plaque. Temporally, between the fatty streak and the fibrous plaque, transitional stages of atherosclerosis exist that are not identifiable by gross examination alone. With time, fibrous plaques enlarge and undergo calcification, hemorrhage, ulceration or rupture, and thrombosis. Thrombotic occlusion precipitates clinical disease such as myocardial infarction, stroke, or gangrene depending on which artery is affected (Fig. 1).1)

Bottom Line: The early stage and progression of atherosclerosis in youth are influenced by risk factors that include obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking, and by the presence of specific diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and Kawasaki disease (KD).The existing evidence indicates that primary prevention of atherosclerotic disease should begin in childhood.Identification of children at risk for atherosclerosis may allow early intervention to decrease the atherosclerotic process, thereby preventing or delaying CVD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Although the clinical manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, appear from middle age, the process of atherosclerosis can begin early in childhood. The early stage and progression of atherosclerosis in youth are influenced by risk factors that include obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking, and by the presence of specific diseases, such as diabetes mellitus and Kawasaki disease (KD). The existing evidence indicates that primary prevention of atherosclerotic disease should begin in childhood. Identification of children at risk for atherosclerosis may allow early intervention to decrease the atherosclerotic process, thereby preventing or delaying CVD. This review will describe the origin and progression of atherosclerosis in childhood, and the identification and management of known risk factors for atherosclerotic CVD in children and young adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus