Limits...
The Open AUC Project.

Cölfen H, Laue TM, Wohlleben W, Schilling K, Karabudak E, Langhorst BW, Brookes E, Dubbs B, Zollars D, Rocco M, Demeler B - Eur. Biophys. J. (2009)

Bottom Line: This ultracentrifuge will be equipped with multiple and interchangeable optical tracks so that state-of-the-art electronics and improved detectors will be available for a variety of optical systems.The instrument will be complemented by a new rotor, enhanced data acquisition and analysis software, as well as collaboration software.Described here are the instrument, the modular software components, and a standardized database that will encourage and ease integration of data analysis and interpretation software.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Colloid Chemistry, Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Research Campus Golm, Am Mühlenberg, 14424 Potsdam, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Progress in analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) has been hindered by obstructions to hardware innovation and by software incompatibility. In this paper, we announce and outline the Open AUC Project. The goals of the Open AUC Project are to stimulate AUC innovation by improving instrumentation, detectors, acquisition and analysis software, and collaborative tools. These improvements are needed for the next generation of AUC-based research. The Open AUC Project combines on-going work from several different groups. A new base instrument is described, one that is designed from the ground up to be an analytical ultracentrifuge. This machine offers an open architecture, hardware standards, and application programming interfaces for detector developers. All software will use the GNU Public License to assure that intellectual property is available in open source format. The Open AUC strategy facilitates collaborations, encourages sharing, and eliminates the chronic impediments that have plagued AUC innovation for the last 20 years. This ultracentrifuge will be equipped with multiple and interchangeable optical tracks so that state-of-the-art electronics and improved detectors will be available for a variety of optical systems. The instrument will be complemented by a new rotor, enhanced data acquisition and analysis software, as well as collaboration software. Described here are the instrument, the modular software components, and a standardized database that will encourage and ease integration of data analysis and interpretation software.

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The multiwavelength detector arm mounted in an XL-A AUC (left) as well as the typical experimental traces in time mode with radially fixed detector and radial mode scanning the AUC cell radially at a fixed time. The x-axis in these plots is the wavelength and the z-axis absorption. The data shown are for sedimenting bovine serum albumin (BSA)
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Fig3: The multiwavelength detector arm mounted in an XL-A AUC (left) as well as the typical experimental traces in time mode with radially fixed detector and radial mode scanning the AUC cell radially at a fixed time. The x-axis in these plots is the wavelength and the z-axis absorption. The data shown are for sedimenting bovine serum albumin (BSA)

Mentions: Multi-wavelength absorbance optics The multi-wavelength system provides an absorbance spectrum at each radial position (Strauss et al. 2008; Bhattacharyya et al. 2006). Deconvolution of these spectra allows the discrimination of individual species sedimenting in complex mixtures of molecules. Cellular and molecular biology will benefit from this optical system since it will allow the size distributions of labeled molecules to be determined in a complex milieu (e.g. cell lysates). Molecules with different chromophores, such as DNA binding proteins, heme proteins or ligands and tagged molecules can be analyzed to study assemblies and complexes. For example, it will be possible to identify the components and characterize the cellular conditions under which molecules sediment as part of a macromolecular complex. Figure 3 shows the current multiwavelength detector and also the sedimentation of bovine serum albumin detected by two different operation modes: the time mode which detects the time dependent sedimentation of the sample with the detector set at a fixed radius and the radial mode which scans the cell radius at a given time. The optics will use a constant light source, a rapid scanning stepping motor, and a fast Andor ICCD camera capable of nanosecond integration time, allowing signal collection of all cell channels in each rotor revolution even at speeds as high as 60,000 rpm.Fig. 3


The Open AUC Project.

Cölfen H, Laue TM, Wohlleben W, Schilling K, Karabudak E, Langhorst BW, Brookes E, Dubbs B, Zollars D, Rocco M, Demeler B - Eur. Biophys. J. (2009)

The multiwavelength detector arm mounted in an XL-A AUC (left) as well as the typical experimental traces in time mode with radially fixed detector and radial mode scanning the AUC cell radially at a fixed time. The x-axis in these plots is the wavelength and the z-axis absorption. The data shown are for sedimenting bovine serum albumin (BSA)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2812709&req=5

Fig3: The multiwavelength detector arm mounted in an XL-A AUC (left) as well as the typical experimental traces in time mode with radially fixed detector and radial mode scanning the AUC cell radially at a fixed time. The x-axis in these plots is the wavelength and the z-axis absorption. The data shown are for sedimenting bovine serum albumin (BSA)
Mentions: Multi-wavelength absorbance optics The multi-wavelength system provides an absorbance spectrum at each radial position (Strauss et al. 2008; Bhattacharyya et al. 2006). Deconvolution of these spectra allows the discrimination of individual species sedimenting in complex mixtures of molecules. Cellular and molecular biology will benefit from this optical system since it will allow the size distributions of labeled molecules to be determined in a complex milieu (e.g. cell lysates). Molecules with different chromophores, such as DNA binding proteins, heme proteins or ligands and tagged molecules can be analyzed to study assemblies and complexes. For example, it will be possible to identify the components and characterize the cellular conditions under which molecules sediment as part of a macromolecular complex. Figure 3 shows the current multiwavelength detector and also the sedimentation of bovine serum albumin detected by two different operation modes: the time mode which detects the time dependent sedimentation of the sample with the detector set at a fixed radius and the radial mode which scans the cell radius at a given time. The optics will use a constant light source, a rapid scanning stepping motor, and a fast Andor ICCD camera capable of nanosecond integration time, allowing signal collection of all cell channels in each rotor revolution even at speeds as high as 60,000 rpm.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: This ultracentrifuge will be equipped with multiple and interchangeable optical tracks so that state-of-the-art electronics and improved detectors will be available for a variety of optical systems.The instrument will be complemented by a new rotor, enhanced data acquisition and analysis software, as well as collaboration software.Described here are the instrument, the modular software components, and a standardized database that will encourage and ease integration of data analysis and interpretation software.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Colloid Chemistry, Max-Planck-Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Research Campus Golm, Am Mühlenberg, 14424 Potsdam, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Progress in analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) has been hindered by obstructions to hardware innovation and by software incompatibility. In this paper, we announce and outline the Open AUC Project. The goals of the Open AUC Project are to stimulate AUC innovation by improving instrumentation, detectors, acquisition and analysis software, and collaborative tools. These improvements are needed for the next generation of AUC-based research. The Open AUC Project combines on-going work from several different groups. A new base instrument is described, one that is designed from the ground up to be an analytical ultracentrifuge. This machine offers an open architecture, hardware standards, and application programming interfaces for detector developers. All software will use the GNU Public License to assure that intellectual property is available in open source format. The Open AUC strategy facilitates collaborations, encourages sharing, and eliminates the chronic impediments that have plagued AUC innovation for the last 20 years. This ultracentrifuge will be equipped with multiple and interchangeable optical tracks so that state-of-the-art electronics and improved detectors will be available for a variety of optical systems. The instrument will be complemented by a new rotor, enhanced data acquisition and analysis software, as well as collaboration software. Described here are the instrument, the modular software components, and a standardized database that will encourage and ease integration of data analysis and interpretation software.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus