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Technical standards for recording and interpretation of neonatal electroencephalogram in clinical practice.

Cherian PJ, Swarte RM, Visser GH - Ann Indian Acad Neurol (2009)

Bottom Line: Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns.The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity.It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Clinical Neurophysiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns. The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity. It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates. In this group, serial EEGs or EEG monitoring often gives additional information regarding deterioration/improvement of the brain function or occurrence of seizures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Neonate with a left middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Voltage asymmetry (suppression of EEG activity) over the left temporal region [Figure 8]
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Figure 0007: Neonate with a left middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Voltage asymmetry (suppression of EEG activity) over the left temporal region [Figure 8]

Mentions: Consistent asymmetry in amplitude of >50% between homologous areas of the brain is abnormal.[24] Etiologies include stroke, sinus thrombosis, hemorrhage, and abscess. The abnormal side usually has lower amplitude with often some of the constituents of the normal background activity missing [Figure 7]. This has to be distinguished from a depression of amplitude with preserved background activity, due to technical reasons (shorter interelectrode distances), edema of the scalp, or a subdural collection.


Technical standards for recording and interpretation of neonatal electroencephalogram in clinical practice.

Cherian PJ, Swarte RM, Visser GH - Ann Indian Acad Neurol (2009)

Neonate with a left middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Voltage asymmetry (suppression of EEG activity) over the left temporal region [Figure 8]
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2811985&req=5

Figure 0007: Neonate with a left middle cerebral artery territory infarct. Voltage asymmetry (suppression of EEG activity) over the left temporal region [Figure 8]
Mentions: Consistent asymmetry in amplitude of >50% between homologous areas of the brain is abnormal.[24] Etiologies include stroke, sinus thrombosis, hemorrhage, and abscess. The abnormal side usually has lower amplitude with often some of the constituents of the normal background activity missing [Figure 7]. This has to be distinguished from a depression of amplitude with preserved background activity, due to technical reasons (shorter interelectrode distances), edema of the scalp, or a subdural collection.

Bottom Line: Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns.The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity.It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Clinical Neurophysiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns. The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity. It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates. In this group, serial EEGs or EEG monitoring often gives additional information regarding deterioration/improvement of the brain function or occurrence of seizures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus