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Technical standards for recording and interpretation of neonatal electroencephalogram in clinical practice.

Cherian PJ, Swarte RM, Visser GH - Ann Indian Acad Neurol (2009)

Bottom Line: Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns.The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity.It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Clinical Neurophysiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns. The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity. It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates. In this group, serial EEGs or EEG monitoring often gives additional information regarding deterioration/improvement of the brain function or occurrence of seizures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trace discontinu in a neonate with moderately severe HIE. Background activity is of low voltage (<20 μV). The discontinuous periods, with a mean voltage of 10 μV, are interrupted by bursts of EEG activity of 2–3 seconds duration. aEEG trend covering 30 minutes shows a band width of 2.5–7 μV. Sleep–wake cycling is absent
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Figure 0005: Trace discontinu in a neonate with moderately severe HIE. Background activity is of low voltage (<20 μV). The discontinuous periods, with a mean voltage of 10 μV, are interrupted by bursts of EEG activity of 2–3 seconds duration. aEEG trend covering 30 minutes shows a band width of 2.5–7 μV. Sleep–wake cycling is absent

Mentions: Abnormalities of voltage seen in encephalopathic neonates, in increasing order of severity are: a) discontinuous EEG [Figure 5], b) continuous low-voltage EEG (voltage < 10 μV throughout the record), c) burst suppression pattern (BS) [Figure 6], and d) an isoelectric EEG or a ‘flat trace’ (voltage consistently < 5 μV).


Technical standards for recording and interpretation of neonatal electroencephalogram in clinical practice.

Cherian PJ, Swarte RM, Visser GH - Ann Indian Acad Neurol (2009)

Trace discontinu in a neonate with moderately severe HIE. Background activity is of low voltage (<20 μV). The discontinuous periods, with a mean voltage of 10 μV, are interrupted by bursts of EEG activity of 2–3 seconds duration. aEEG trend covering 30 minutes shows a band width of 2.5–7 μV. Sleep–wake cycling is absent
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2811985&req=5

Figure 0005: Trace discontinu in a neonate with moderately severe HIE. Background activity is of low voltage (<20 μV). The discontinuous periods, with a mean voltage of 10 μV, are interrupted by bursts of EEG activity of 2–3 seconds duration. aEEG trend covering 30 minutes shows a band width of 2.5–7 μV. Sleep–wake cycling is absent
Mentions: Abnormalities of voltage seen in encephalopathic neonates, in increasing order of severity are: a) discontinuous EEG [Figure 5], b) continuous low-voltage EEG (voltage < 10 μV throughout the record), c) burst suppression pattern (BS) [Figure 6], and d) an isoelectric EEG or a ‘flat trace’ (voltage consistently < 5 μV).

Bottom Line: Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns.The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity.It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Clinical Neurophysiology, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center, Rotterdam, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal electroencephalogram (EEG), though often perceived as being difficult to record and interpret, is relatively easy to study due to the immature nature of the brain, which expresses only a few well-defined set of patterns. The EEG interpreter needs to be aware of the maturational changes as well as the effect of pathological processes and medication on brain activity. It gives valuable information for the treatment and prognostication in encephalopathic neonates. In this group, serial EEGs or EEG monitoring often gives additional information regarding deterioration/improvement of the brain function or occurrence of seizures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus