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Neuroimaging in psychiatry: from bench to bedside.

Linden DE, Fallgatter AJ - Front Hum Neurosci (2009)

Bottom Line: These different questions are illustrated by examples from neuroimaging studies, with a focus on severe mental and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and depression.Despite all reservations addressed in the article, we are optimistic that neuroimaging has a huge potential with regard to the above-mentioned questions.We expect that neuroimaging will play an increasing role in the future refinement of the diagnostic process and aid in the development of new therapies in the field of psychiatry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bangor Imaging Unit, Wolfson Centre for Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Bangor University Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
This perspective considers the present and the future role of different neuroimaging techniques in the field of psychiatry. After identifying shortcomings of the mainly symptom-focussed diagnostic processes and treatment decisions in modern psychiatry, we suggest topics where neuroimaging methods have the potential to help. These include better understanding of the pathophysiology, improved diagnoses, assistance in therapeutic decisions and the supervision of treatment success by direct assessment of improvement in disease-related brain functions. These different questions are illustrated by examples from neuroimaging studies, with a focus on severe mental and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and depression. Despite all reservations addressed in the article, we are optimistic that neuroimaging has a huge potential with regard to the above-mentioned questions. We expect that neuroimaging will play an increasing role in the future refinement of the diagnostic process and aid in the development of new therapies in the field of psychiatry.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The endophenotype concept illustrated using the example of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder showing the way from genetic information to the levels of cell and systems function to a clinical phenotype. Additional influences by other factors may occur at every level.
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Figure 1: The endophenotype concept illustrated using the example of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder showing the way from genetic information to the levels of cell and systems function to a clinical phenotype. Additional influences by other factors may occur at every level.

Mentions: Finally, neuroimaging measures may also be considered as intermediate phenotypes or endophenotypes which are more closely correlated with the fundamental (e.g., genetic) abnormalities of psychiatric disorders than the behaviour and the clinical symptoms themselves (see Figure 1).


Neuroimaging in psychiatry: from bench to bedside.

Linden DE, Fallgatter AJ - Front Hum Neurosci (2009)

The endophenotype concept illustrated using the example of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder showing the way from genetic information to the levels of cell and systems function to a clinical phenotype. Additional influences by other factors may occur at every level.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807751&req=5

Figure 1: The endophenotype concept illustrated using the example of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder showing the way from genetic information to the levels of cell and systems function to a clinical phenotype. Additional influences by other factors may occur at every level.
Mentions: Finally, neuroimaging measures may also be considered as intermediate phenotypes or endophenotypes which are more closely correlated with the fundamental (e.g., genetic) abnormalities of psychiatric disorders than the behaviour and the clinical symptoms themselves (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: These different questions are illustrated by examples from neuroimaging studies, with a focus on severe mental and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and depression.Despite all reservations addressed in the article, we are optimistic that neuroimaging has a huge potential with regard to the above-mentioned questions.We expect that neuroimaging will play an increasing role in the future refinement of the diagnostic process and aid in the development of new therapies in the field of psychiatry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bangor Imaging Unit, Wolfson Centre for Clinical and Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Bangor University Bangor, UK.

ABSTRACT
This perspective considers the present and the future role of different neuroimaging techniques in the field of psychiatry. After identifying shortcomings of the mainly symptom-focussed diagnostic processes and treatment decisions in modern psychiatry, we suggest topics where neuroimaging methods have the potential to help. These include better understanding of the pathophysiology, improved diagnoses, assistance in therapeutic decisions and the supervision of treatment success by direct assessment of improvement in disease-related brain functions. These different questions are illustrated by examples from neuroimaging studies, with a focus on severe mental and neuropsychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and depression. Despite all reservations addressed in the article, we are optimistic that neuroimaging has a huge potential with regard to the above-mentioned questions. We expect that neuroimaging will play an increasing role in the future refinement of the diagnostic process and aid in the development of new therapies in the field of psychiatry.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus