Limits...
Flow pumping system for physiological waveforms.

Tsai W, Savaş O - Med Biol Eng Comput (2010)

Bottom Line: The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component.The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation.The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. wtsai@berkeley.edu

ABSTRACT
A pulsatile flow pumping system is developed to replicate flow waveforms with reasonable accuracy for experiments simulating physiological blood flows at numerous points in the body. The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component. The system is driven by two programmable servo controllers. The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation. The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

Show MeSH
Comparison of the carotid input waveform (solid line) [5], mean output flow (dashed line), and spread of the extrema (dotted lines)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807595&req=5

Fig5: Comparison of the carotid input waveform (solid line) [5], mean output flow (dashed line), and spread of the extrema (dotted lines)

Mentions: The accuracy and repeatability tests display the performance of the system for physiological inputs: coronary (Fig. 4) and carotid (Fig. 5) waveforms. Root mean square deviations of the mean output flow curve to the sinusoidal, coronary, and carotid input waveforms are σ = 0.03, σ = 0.10, and σ = 0.05, respectively. These results compare well to the performance of other physiological pumps. Frayne et al. [2] had an RMS deviation of 0.8 ml/s for a carotid waveform with a peak flow rate of 15 ml/s. Plewes et al. [11] had a RMS error that was as high as 20% on the first iteration, but improved to less than 1% over 15 iterations for a 2-Hz sinusoidal waveform. Wong et al. [14] were able to achieve aortic flow waveforms with a normalized cross correlations of 0.94 after the use of the pre-compensation scheme.Fig. 4


Flow pumping system for physiological waveforms.

Tsai W, Savaş O - Med Biol Eng Comput (2010)

Comparison of the carotid input waveform (solid line) [5], mean output flow (dashed line), and spread of the extrema (dotted lines)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807595&req=5

Fig5: Comparison of the carotid input waveform (solid line) [5], mean output flow (dashed line), and spread of the extrema (dotted lines)
Mentions: The accuracy and repeatability tests display the performance of the system for physiological inputs: coronary (Fig. 4) and carotid (Fig. 5) waveforms. Root mean square deviations of the mean output flow curve to the sinusoidal, coronary, and carotid input waveforms are σ = 0.03, σ = 0.10, and σ = 0.05, respectively. These results compare well to the performance of other physiological pumps. Frayne et al. [2] had an RMS deviation of 0.8 ml/s for a carotid waveform with a peak flow rate of 15 ml/s. Plewes et al. [11] had a RMS error that was as high as 20% on the first iteration, but improved to less than 1% over 15 iterations for a 2-Hz sinusoidal waveform. Wong et al. [14] were able to achieve aortic flow waveforms with a normalized cross correlations of 0.94 after the use of the pre-compensation scheme.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component.The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation.The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. wtsai@berkeley.edu

ABSTRACT
A pulsatile flow pumping system is developed to replicate flow waveforms with reasonable accuracy for experiments simulating physiological blood flows at numerous points in the body. The system divides the task of flow waveform generation between two pumps: a gear pump generates the mean component and a piston pump generates the oscillatory component. The system is driven by two programmable servo controllers. The frequency response of the system is used to characterize its operation. The system has been successfully tested in vascular flow experiments where sinusoidal, carotid, and coronary flow waveforms are replicated.

Show MeSH