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On the origins of a Vibrio species.

Vesth T, Wassenaar TM, Hallin PF, Snipen L, Lagesen K, Ussery DW - Microb. Ecol. (2010)

Bottom Line: By comparing gene family content of the analysed genomes, the relatedness to a particular species is identified for two unspeciated genomes.Conversely, two genomes presumably belonging to the same species have suspiciously dissimilar gene family content.Some of these genes may be crucial to the niche adaptation of this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Thirty-two genome sequences of various Vibrionaceae members are compared, with emphasis on what makes V. cholerae unique. As few as 1,000 gene families are conserved across all the Vibrionaceae genomes analysed; this fraction roughly doubles for gene families conserved within the species V. cholerae. Of these, approximately 200 gene families that cluster on various locations of the genome are not found in other sequenced Vibrionaceae; these are possibly unique to the V. cholerae species. By comparing gene family content of the analysed genomes, the relatedness to a particular species is identified for two unspeciated genomes. Conversely, two genomes presumably belonging to the same species have suspiciously dissimilar gene family content. We are able to identify a number of genes that are conserved in, and unique to, V. cholerae. Some of these genes may be crucial to the niche adaptation of this species.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA gene extracted from 32 sequenced Vibrio genomes listed in Table 1. Environmental V. cholerae lacking the cholera enterotoxin genes are highlighted in bright green, whilst pathogenic V. cholerae genomes are in dark green. Further colouring was used for species for which two genomes are represented
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Fig1: Phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA gene extracted from 32 sequenced Vibrio genomes listed in Table 1. Environmental V. cholerae lacking the cholera enterotoxin genes are highlighted in bright green, whilst pathogenic V. cholerae genomes are in dark green. Further colouring was used for species for which two genomes are represented

Mentions: A phylogenetic tree based on the 16S rRNA gene extracted from the 32 analysed Vibrionaceae genomes is shown in Fig. 1. The 18 V. cholerae genomes build a tight subcluster, quite distanced from the other species. Above this in the figure, another subcluster comprising eight genomes representing at least six species is recognised, and within this cluster the two V. parahaemolyticus genes are not found on the same branch. A third cluster, a bit further removed, includes Aliivibrio fischeri and A. almonidica as well as V. splendidus and Vibrio species MED 222; the gene of Photobacterium profundum is the most distant.Figure 1


On the origins of a Vibrio species.

Vesth T, Wassenaar TM, Hallin PF, Snipen L, Lagesen K, Ussery DW - Microb. Ecol. (2010)

Phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA gene extracted from 32 sequenced Vibrio genomes listed in Table 1. Environmental V. cholerae lacking the cholera enterotoxin genes are highlighted in bright green, whilst pathogenic V. cholerae genomes are in dark green. Further colouring was used for species for which two genomes are represented
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807590&req=5

Fig1: Phylogenetic tree of the 16S rRNA gene extracted from 32 sequenced Vibrio genomes listed in Table 1. Environmental V. cholerae lacking the cholera enterotoxin genes are highlighted in bright green, whilst pathogenic V. cholerae genomes are in dark green. Further colouring was used for species for which two genomes are represented
Mentions: A phylogenetic tree based on the 16S rRNA gene extracted from the 32 analysed Vibrionaceae genomes is shown in Fig. 1. The 18 V. cholerae genomes build a tight subcluster, quite distanced from the other species. Above this in the figure, another subcluster comprising eight genomes representing at least six species is recognised, and within this cluster the two V. parahaemolyticus genes are not found on the same branch. A third cluster, a bit further removed, includes Aliivibrio fischeri and A. almonidica as well as V. splendidus and Vibrio species MED 222; the gene of Photobacterium profundum is the most distant.Figure 1

Bottom Line: By comparing gene family content of the analysed genomes, the relatedness to a particular species is identified for two unspeciated genomes.Conversely, two genomes presumably belonging to the same species have suspiciously dissimilar gene family content.Some of these genes may be crucial to the niche adaptation of this species.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Biological Sequence Analysis, Department of Systems Biology, The Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Thirty-two genome sequences of various Vibrionaceae members are compared, with emphasis on what makes V. cholerae unique. As few as 1,000 gene families are conserved across all the Vibrionaceae genomes analysed; this fraction roughly doubles for gene families conserved within the species V. cholerae. Of these, approximately 200 gene families that cluster on various locations of the genome are not found in other sequenced Vibrionaceae; these are possibly unique to the V. cholerae species. By comparing gene family content of the analysed genomes, the relatedness to a particular species is identified for two unspeciated genomes. Conversely, two genomes presumably belonging to the same species have suspiciously dissimilar gene family content. We are able to identify a number of genes that are conserved in, and unique to, V. cholerae. Some of these genes may be crucial to the niche adaptation of this species.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus