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Apocrine hidradenocarcinoma of the scalp: a classification conundrum.

Cohen M, Cassarino DS, Shih HB, Abemayor E, St John M - Head Neck Pathol (2008)

Bottom Line: Traditionally, cutaneous sweat gland tumors have been classified by either eccrine or apocrine features.The classification and behavior of this entity are discussed in this report.Apocrine hidradenocarcinoma can be viewed as an aggressive malignant lesion of cutaneous sweat glands on a spectrum that involves both eccrine and apoeccrine lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, 10838 Le Conte Ave, Rm 62-132 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. macohen@mednet.ucla.edu

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The classification of malignant sweat gland lesions is complex. Traditionally, cutaneous sweat gland tumors have been classified by either eccrine or apocrine features.

Methods: A case report of a 33-year-old Hispanic man with a left scalp mass diagnosed as a malignancy of adnexal origin preoperatively is discussed. After presentation at our multidisciplinary tumor board, excision with ipsilateral neck dissection was undertaken.

Results: Final pathology revealed an apocrine hidradenocarcinoma. The classification and behavior of this entity are discussed in this report.

Conclusion: Apocrine hidradenocarcinoma can be viewed as an aggressive malignant lesion of cutaneous sweat glands on a spectrum that involves both eccrine and apoeccrine lesions.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

After the patient’s scalp has been shaved, the 5 × 5 × 4 cm mass at the left parietal scalp as seen upon initial presentation
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Fig1: After the patient’s scalp has been shaved, the 5 × 5 × 4 cm mass at the left parietal scalp as seen upon initial presentation

Mentions: Physical examination revealed a 5 × 5 × 4 cm painless mass at the left posterior scalp (Fig. 1). The mass appeared to be extremely vascular with normal overlying skin. The mass did not feel to be fixated to the underlying calvarium. In addition, multiple enlarged left level V lymph nodes were palpated.Fig. 1


Apocrine hidradenocarcinoma of the scalp: a classification conundrum.

Cohen M, Cassarino DS, Shih HB, Abemayor E, St John M - Head Neck Pathol (2008)

After the patient’s scalp has been shaved, the 5 × 5 × 4 cm mass at the left parietal scalp as seen upon initial presentation
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807530&req=5

Fig1: After the patient’s scalp has been shaved, the 5 × 5 × 4 cm mass at the left parietal scalp as seen upon initial presentation
Mentions: Physical examination revealed a 5 × 5 × 4 cm painless mass at the left posterior scalp (Fig. 1). The mass appeared to be extremely vascular with normal overlying skin. The mass did not feel to be fixated to the underlying calvarium. In addition, multiple enlarged left level V lymph nodes were palpated.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Traditionally, cutaneous sweat gland tumors have been classified by either eccrine or apocrine features.The classification and behavior of this entity are discussed in this report.Apocrine hidradenocarcinoma can be viewed as an aggressive malignant lesion of cutaneous sweat glands on a spectrum that involves both eccrine and apoeccrine lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA School of Medicine, 10838 Le Conte Ave, Rm 62-132 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. macohen@mednet.ucla.edu

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The classification of malignant sweat gland lesions is complex. Traditionally, cutaneous sweat gland tumors have been classified by either eccrine or apocrine features.

Methods: A case report of a 33-year-old Hispanic man with a left scalp mass diagnosed as a malignancy of adnexal origin preoperatively is discussed. After presentation at our multidisciplinary tumor board, excision with ipsilateral neck dissection was undertaken.

Results: Final pathology revealed an apocrine hidradenocarcinoma. The classification and behavior of this entity are discussed in this report.

Conclusion: Apocrine hidradenocarcinoma can be viewed as an aggressive malignant lesion of cutaneous sweat glands on a spectrum that involves both eccrine and apoeccrine lesions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus