Limits...
Why is the center of evidence-based dermatology relevant to Indian dermatology?

Williams H - Indian J Dermatol (2009)

Bottom Line: Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases.The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients.Such new knowledge only has value if it is shared and used.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology, King's Meadow Campus, University of Nottingham, Lenton Lane, Nottingham NG7 2NR, UK. Hywel.williams@nottingham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN), and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knowledge only has value if it is shared and used.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The Cochrane Skin Group logo shows five hands representing the five continents of the world joined together in the pursuit of the truth about skin disease treatments
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807149&req=5

Figure 0004: The Cochrane Skin Group logo shows five hands representing the five continents of the world joined together in the pursuit of the truth about skin disease treatments

Mentions: It was the failure of the medical profession to systematically collate evidence from high quality randomised controlled trials that prompted the late Professor Archie Cochrane to challenge doctors to do something about it in the 1970s. The International Cochrane Collaboration was formed 25 years later in response to this challenge. The Cochrane Collaboration is a non-profit organisation of individuals that now contains over 50 review groups covering all aspects of human medicine. The Cochrane Skin Group [Figure 4] is one such group that was formed in 1997 and is supported by an editorial base at our Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in Nottingham. The editorial base comprises a review group coordinator, an editorial assistant, a trials search co-ordinator, and a co-ordinating editor (the author). Our job is to prioritise and support high-quality systematic reviews of interventions to prevent or treat skin diseases using the methods developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. So far, the Skin Group has published 39 full reviews and a similar number of published protocols that will eventually become full reviews. Some reviews relevant to dermatology are produced by other groups such as the Wounds, Pregnancy and Childbirth or Infectious Diseases Groups so that there are now over 100 reviews published on the Cochrane Library relevant to dermatology. Some have criticised Cochrane reviews for always concluding that there is insufficient evidence to recommend anything. Whilst this might be true for a lot of skin conditions where the evidence has been characterising by lots of small, poorly reported studies, a recent review found that Cochrane dermatology reviews fond that clear clinical recommendations were made in around 40% of cases.[10] Cochrane Skin Group reviews are of high relevance to people around the world and not just those who work in the UK. Not only do they deal with common conditions such as acne, psoriasis, and eczema, which affect all of the world's populations, but they also cover diseases that occur in developing countries such as cutaneous leishmaniasis, leprosy, and tropical ulcers. Venereal diseases are dealt with by the relatively newly formed Cochrane Sexually Transmitted Diseases group. Unlike other publications that quickly become out of date, Cochrane reviews are updated periodically as new evidence becomes available. Anybody can get involved in preparing and maintaining reviews but the work is hard and a degree of training and experience is needed before somebody leads a new review team. At the very least, anyone can read Cochrane reviews and use the evidence to inform daily practice. Cochrane reviews are published every quarter in an online product called the Cochrane Library, which also contains the largest database of clinical trials in the world and other useful methodological resources. And here is the most fascinating thing about the whole endeavour: During one of my talks at the 36th National Conference of the Indian Association of Dermatologists, I asked members of the audience about the Cochrane Library. Several had heard of it but none claimed to have access to it. Yet 10 minutes before that lecture, I tried accessing the Cochrane Library from a terminal at the meeting by typing in www.thecochranelibrary.org and found full access to the Cochrane Library that was completely free. So there is no excuse for not at least looking at Cochrane reviews because the Indian Government has made it possible to gain full and free access from any computer with an internet connection in India.


Why is the center of evidence-based dermatology relevant to Indian dermatology?

Williams H - Indian J Dermatol (2009)

The Cochrane Skin Group logo shows five hands representing the five continents of the world joined together in the pursuit of the truth about skin disease treatments
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2807149&req=5

Figure 0004: The Cochrane Skin Group logo shows five hands representing the five continents of the world joined together in the pursuit of the truth about skin disease treatments
Mentions: It was the failure of the medical profession to systematically collate evidence from high quality randomised controlled trials that prompted the late Professor Archie Cochrane to challenge doctors to do something about it in the 1970s. The International Cochrane Collaboration was formed 25 years later in response to this challenge. The Cochrane Collaboration is a non-profit organisation of individuals that now contains over 50 review groups covering all aspects of human medicine. The Cochrane Skin Group [Figure 4] is one such group that was formed in 1997 and is supported by an editorial base at our Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in Nottingham. The editorial base comprises a review group coordinator, an editorial assistant, a trials search co-ordinator, and a co-ordinating editor (the author). Our job is to prioritise and support high-quality systematic reviews of interventions to prevent or treat skin diseases using the methods developed by the Cochrane Collaboration. So far, the Skin Group has published 39 full reviews and a similar number of published protocols that will eventually become full reviews. Some reviews relevant to dermatology are produced by other groups such as the Wounds, Pregnancy and Childbirth or Infectious Diseases Groups so that there are now over 100 reviews published on the Cochrane Library relevant to dermatology. Some have criticised Cochrane reviews for always concluding that there is insufficient evidence to recommend anything. Whilst this might be true for a lot of skin conditions where the evidence has been characterising by lots of small, poorly reported studies, a recent review found that Cochrane dermatology reviews fond that clear clinical recommendations were made in around 40% of cases.[10] Cochrane Skin Group reviews are of high relevance to people around the world and not just those who work in the UK. Not only do they deal with common conditions such as acne, psoriasis, and eczema, which affect all of the world's populations, but they also cover diseases that occur in developing countries such as cutaneous leishmaniasis, leprosy, and tropical ulcers. Venereal diseases are dealt with by the relatively newly formed Cochrane Sexually Transmitted Diseases group. Unlike other publications that quickly become out of date, Cochrane reviews are updated periodically as new evidence becomes available. Anybody can get involved in preparing and maintaining reviews but the work is hard and a degree of training and experience is needed before somebody leads a new review team. At the very least, anyone can read Cochrane reviews and use the evidence to inform daily practice. Cochrane reviews are published every quarter in an online product called the Cochrane Library, which also contains the largest database of clinical trials in the world and other useful methodological resources. And here is the most fascinating thing about the whole endeavour: During one of my talks at the 36th National Conference of the Indian Association of Dermatologists, I asked members of the audience about the Cochrane Library. Several had heard of it but none claimed to have access to it. Yet 10 minutes before that lecture, I tried accessing the Cochrane Library from a terminal at the meeting by typing in www.thecochranelibrary.org and found full access to the Cochrane Library that was completely free. So there is no excuse for not at least looking at Cochrane reviews because the Indian Government has made it possible to gain full and free access from any computer with an internet connection in India.

Bottom Line: Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases.The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients.Such new knowledge only has value if it is shared and used.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology, King's Meadow Campus, University of Nottingham, Lenton Lane, Nottingham NG7 2NR, UK. Hywel.williams@nottingham.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Evidence-based dermatology is the application of high-quality evidence to the care of individual patients with skin diseases. The Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology in the UK promotes activities in this field through its three interlinking cogs, composed of the international Cochrane Skin Group, the UK Dermatology Clinical Trials Network (UKDCTN), and the UK national electronic library for skin disorders. The Cochrane Skin Group summarises what is already known about health care interventions by supporting systematic reviews of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The UKDCTN then addresses the key research gaps identified in systematic reviews by coordinating and carrying out well-designed RCTs. The Skin Disorders specialist library then plays a key role in disseminating new knowledge from systematic reviews and RCTs to a community of clinical users. The electronic resources at the Centre of Evidence-Based Dermatology are all freely available to Indian Dermatologists who can use the resources in a way that could benefit their patients. Such new knowledge only has value if it is shared and used.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus