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Biographical sketch: Virgil Pendleton [corrected] Gibney, MD, 1847-1927.

Brand RA - Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. (2010)

Bottom Line: This biographical sketch on Virgil Pendelton Gibney corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Chapter XVIII.Operative Treatment in Chronic Articular Ostitis, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1165-3 .

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 1600 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA. dick.brand@clinorthop.org

ABSTRACT
This biographical sketch on Virgil Pendelton Gibney corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Chapter XVIII. Operative Treatment in Chronic Articular Ostitis, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1165-3 .

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A photograph of Gibney at age 24. (Courtesy of Hospital for Special Surgery Archives.)
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Fig1: A photograph of Gibney at age 24. (Courtesy of Hospital for Special Surgery Archives.)

Mentions: Dr. Virgil Pendleton Gibney was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky in 1847 [3]. Although born on a farm, Gibney’s father, an immigrant from Northern Ireland, was a general practitioner and also owned part of a retail store to supplement the family income [11]. Gibney lost his ring and little finger in an accident at age 11, but this evidently did not stop him from pursuing surgery [11]. He obtained his undergraduate education at the University of Kentucky, from which he graduated in 1869. He then earned his MD degree from the Bellevue Hospital Medical School in New York City in 1871 [3]. (The Bellevue Hospital Medical College was the first medical college in New York connected to a hospital and in 1861 produced the first outpatient department associated with a hospital, the “Bureau of Medical and Surgical Relief for the Out of Door Poor” [1].) At age 24, in 1871, Gibney was appointed an Assistant Physician and Surgeon to the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (the predecessor to the Hospital for Special Surgery) (Fig. 1). According to Levine, “This was a strange appointment as Gibney was a disciple of Lewis H. Sayre, M.D., who represented everything that Knight was not” [10]. (Knight, who served as the President of the Board of the hospital, “had the personality of a surgeon but ironically was vehemently antisurgery” [10]. Sayre, on the other hand, was a cautious advocate of surgery in the new Listerian age.) According to Sherk, “Knight forced Gibney to renounce the idea of surgical treatment of musculoskeletal deformity” whereupon Gibney resigned and toured European hospitals to more thoroughly study surgical treatment [6]. (The reader should recall Knight had trained and largely practiced in the days before anesthesia, antiseptic surgery, fluid management, and blood transfusions. Given the high mortality and complication rates of surgery, Knight’s position was not so outrageous as it might otherwise seem.) However, Gibney evidently returned to the hospital because in the preface of his book in 1884 he stated, “For thirteen years I have resided in the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, all of my time being devoted to daily service in both the in-door and the out-door departments” (it was not unusual for physicians to reside in the hospital) [5]. Undoubtedly, Gibney operated little in those days: Fig. 1


Biographical sketch: Virgil Pendleton [corrected] Gibney, MD, 1847-1927.

Brand RA - Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res. (2010)

A photograph of Gibney at age 24. (Courtesy of Hospital for Special Surgery Archives.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2806971&req=5

Fig1: A photograph of Gibney at age 24. (Courtesy of Hospital for Special Surgery Archives.)
Mentions: Dr. Virgil Pendleton Gibney was born in Jessamine County, Kentucky in 1847 [3]. Although born on a farm, Gibney’s father, an immigrant from Northern Ireland, was a general practitioner and also owned part of a retail store to supplement the family income [11]. Gibney lost his ring and little finger in an accident at age 11, but this evidently did not stop him from pursuing surgery [11]. He obtained his undergraduate education at the University of Kentucky, from which he graduated in 1869. He then earned his MD degree from the Bellevue Hospital Medical School in New York City in 1871 [3]. (The Bellevue Hospital Medical College was the first medical college in New York connected to a hospital and in 1861 produced the first outpatient department associated with a hospital, the “Bureau of Medical and Surgical Relief for the Out of Door Poor” [1].) At age 24, in 1871, Gibney was appointed an Assistant Physician and Surgeon to the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled (the predecessor to the Hospital for Special Surgery) (Fig. 1). According to Levine, “This was a strange appointment as Gibney was a disciple of Lewis H. Sayre, M.D., who represented everything that Knight was not” [10]. (Knight, who served as the President of the Board of the hospital, “had the personality of a surgeon but ironically was vehemently antisurgery” [10]. Sayre, on the other hand, was a cautious advocate of surgery in the new Listerian age.) According to Sherk, “Knight forced Gibney to renounce the idea of surgical treatment of musculoskeletal deformity” whereupon Gibney resigned and toured European hospitals to more thoroughly study surgical treatment [6]. (The reader should recall Knight had trained and largely practiced in the days before anesthesia, antiseptic surgery, fluid management, and blood transfusions. Given the high mortality and complication rates of surgery, Knight’s position was not so outrageous as it might otherwise seem.) However, Gibney evidently returned to the hospital because in the preface of his book in 1884 he stated, “For thirteen years I have resided in the Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, all of my time being devoted to daily service in both the in-door and the out-door departments” (it was not unusual for physicians to reside in the hospital) [5]. Undoubtedly, Gibney operated little in those days: Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This biographical sketch on Virgil Pendelton Gibney corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Chapter XVIII.Operative Treatment in Chronic Articular Ostitis, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1165-3 .

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 1600 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA. dick.brand@clinorthop.org

ABSTRACT
This biographical sketch on Virgil Pendelton Gibney corresponds to the historic text, The Classic: Chapter XVIII. Operative Treatment in Chronic Articular Ostitis, available at DOI 10.1007/s11999-009-1165-3 .

Show MeSH