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The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model.

Small D, Glickman A, Rigter G, Walter T - Harm Reduct J (2010)

Bottom Line: Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model.Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them.Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: PHS Community Services Society, 20 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 1G6, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Syringe receptacle at Seaworld. A photograph showing a syringe receptacle in the bathroom at the Seaworld public attraction.
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Figure 3: Syringe receptacle at Seaworld. A photograph showing a syringe receptacle in the bathroom at the Seaworld public attraction.

Mentions: In 1999, the health authorities in Vancouver began a process to decentralize needle distribution with a plan to make syringes available through a variety of government clinics and non-profit agencies serving active drug addicts. By the year 2000, the health authority for Vancouver was supervising the distribution of syringes through health clinics, peer support groups, homeless shelters, non-profit agencies and housing providers. This took place against a backdrop of a widespread attempt to place needle disposal boxes in healthcare, housing and public settings. This process of expanding retrieval points for used syringes in public places for needles is not unique to Canada. Today, needle retrieval boxes are located in many public places such as the bathrooms at the famous San Diego SeaWorld attraction (see Figure 3).


The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model.

Small D, Glickman A, Rigter G, Walter T - Harm Reduct J (2010)

Syringe receptacle at Seaworld. A photograph showing a syringe receptacle in the bathroom at the Seaworld public attraction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2806876&req=5

Figure 3: Syringe receptacle at Seaworld. A photograph showing a syringe receptacle in the bathroom at the Seaworld public attraction.
Mentions: In 1999, the health authorities in Vancouver began a process to decentralize needle distribution with a plan to make syringes available through a variety of government clinics and non-profit agencies serving active drug addicts. By the year 2000, the health authority for Vancouver was supervising the distribution of syringes through health clinics, peer support groups, homeless shelters, non-profit agencies and housing providers. This took place against a backdrop of a widespread attempt to place needle disposal boxes in healthcare, housing and public settings. This process of expanding retrieval points for used syringes in public places for needles is not unique to Canada. Today, needle retrieval boxes are located in many public places such as the bathrooms at the famous San Diego SeaWorld attraction (see Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model.Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them.Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: PHS Community Services Society, 20 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC, V6B 1G6, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs) must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus