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Basal cell adenocarcinoma of a hard palate minor salivary gland: case report and review of the literature.

Ward BK, Seethala RR, Barnes EL, Lai SY - Head Neck Oncol (2009)

Bottom Line: Histological diagnosis is important to distinguish this tumour from adenoid cystic carcinoma given the significant difference in disease prognosis.Diagnosis of these tumours must be made histologically.Recommended treatment options include wide local excision with radiotherapy reserved for close surgical margins or for local recurrence.

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Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. bward15@jhmi.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: Basal cell adenocarcinoma of a minor salivary gland is extremely rare. The goal of this report is to increase awareness of this rare disease and to review and discuss the differential diagnosis and important considerations in treatment.

Study design: Case report and review of the literature.

Methods: Case report of a basal cell adenocarcinoma of a hard palate minor salivary gland and review of the literature of basal cell adenocarcinoma.

Results: Basal cell adenocarcinomas are slow-growing tumours that most commonly involve the parotid gland and very rarely involve minor salivary glands. Although recurrence rates for these tumours are high, mortality rates are low. Histological diagnosis is important to distinguish this tumour from adenoid cystic carcinoma given the significant difference in disease prognosis.

Conclusions: Diagnosis of these tumours must be made histologically. Recommended treatment options include wide local excision with radiotherapy reserved for close surgical margins or for local recurrence.

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Axial non-contrast computed tomography scan demonstrating mass at posterior septum with extension into hard palate.
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Figure 1: Axial non-contrast computed tomography scan demonstrating mass at posterior septum with extension into hard palate.

Mentions: A 69 year-old woman presented with a one-year history of a persistent ulcer on her hard palate and a poorly fitting upper denture plate. During this period, the patient had no weight loss, symptoms of nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, or dysesthesias. A midline 2 × 2.5 cm mass was present on her central hard palate with raised surfaces, an area of central ulceration, and soft palate extension. No lymphadenopathy was detected. An axial computed tomography (CT) scan image revealed a 2-cm heterogeneously enhancing mass at the nasal septum extending into the hard palate (Figure 1) and biopsy of the mass indicated possible carcinoma.


Basal cell adenocarcinoma of a hard palate minor salivary gland: case report and review of the literature.

Ward BK, Seethala RR, Barnes EL, Lai SY - Head Neck Oncol (2009)

Axial non-contrast computed tomography scan demonstrating mass at posterior septum with extension into hard palate.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2806868&req=5

Figure 1: Axial non-contrast computed tomography scan demonstrating mass at posterior septum with extension into hard palate.
Mentions: A 69 year-old woman presented with a one-year history of a persistent ulcer on her hard palate and a poorly fitting upper denture plate. During this period, the patient had no weight loss, symptoms of nasal obstruction, nasal discharge, or dysesthesias. A midline 2 × 2.5 cm mass was present on her central hard palate with raised surfaces, an area of central ulceration, and soft palate extension. No lymphadenopathy was detected. An axial computed tomography (CT) scan image revealed a 2-cm heterogeneously enhancing mass at the nasal septum extending into the hard palate (Figure 1) and biopsy of the mass indicated possible carcinoma.

Bottom Line: Histological diagnosis is important to distinguish this tumour from adenoid cystic carcinoma given the significant difference in disease prognosis.Diagnosis of these tumours must be made histologically.Recommended treatment options include wide local excision with radiotherapy reserved for close surgical margins or for local recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. bward15@jhmi.edu

ABSTRACT

Objective: Basal cell adenocarcinoma of a minor salivary gland is extremely rare. The goal of this report is to increase awareness of this rare disease and to review and discuss the differential diagnosis and important considerations in treatment.

Study design: Case report and review of the literature.

Methods: Case report of a basal cell adenocarcinoma of a hard palate minor salivary gland and review of the literature of basal cell adenocarcinoma.

Results: Basal cell adenocarcinomas are slow-growing tumours that most commonly involve the parotid gland and very rarely involve minor salivary glands. Although recurrence rates for these tumours are high, mortality rates are low. Histological diagnosis is important to distinguish this tumour from adenoid cystic carcinoma given the significant difference in disease prognosis.

Conclusions: Diagnosis of these tumours must be made histologically. Recommended treatment options include wide local excision with radiotherapy reserved for close surgical margins or for local recurrence.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus