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microRNA evaluation of unknown primary lesions in the head and neck.

Barker EV, Cervigne NK, Reis PP, Goswami RS, Xu W, Weinreb I, Irish JC, Kamel-Reid S - Mol. Cancer (2009)

Bottom Line: Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression has been associated with both cancer progression and metastasis.As proof of principle, our study provides an indication that miRNA expression analysis may be useful to compare the primary lesion and local metastatic disease.This may be clinically relevant to predict the primary site of origin of metastatic disease, when the primary site remains obscure.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Molecular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario Cancer Institute and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. emmabarker@doctors.org.uk

ABSTRACT
Unknown primary malignancy in the head and neck is not an infrequent diagnosis for patients with metastatic cervical lymph nodes. Although linked with a relatively good prognosis following radiation treatment, widespread radiation is coupled with significant morbidity. Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression has been associated with both cancer progression and metastasis. We sought to determine whether miRNA expression analysis could be used as a diagnostic tool to discover the primary site of malignancy, within the head and neck. We used quantitative real-time PCR to identify miRNA expression profiles of squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, base of tongue and post-nasal space, as well as their corresponding metastatic lymph nodes, from 6 patients. Our results revealed that each cancer maintained its expression profile between the primary site and the nodal metastasis (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). In addition, each anatomical sub-site maintained a distinct miRNA profile between individual patients (r = 0.79, p < 0.0001). Finally, between sub-sites, the miRNA profiles were distinct (p < 0.0001). As proof of principle, our study provides an indication that miRNA expression analysis may be useful to compare the primary lesion and local metastatic disease. This may be clinically relevant to predict the primary site of origin of metastatic disease, when the primary site remains obscure.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal component analysis based on the differential expression levels of 5 miRs (miR-137, miR-210, miR-200c, miR-213, and miR-622). These miRs showed the most significant differential expression according to each tumor site. The dot plots represent the relative expression levels of each miR across all sites.
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Figure 1: Principal component analysis based on the differential expression levels of 5 miRs (miR-137, miR-210, miR-200c, miR-213, and miR-622). These miRs showed the most significant differential expression according to each tumor site. The dot plots represent the relative expression levels of each miR across all sites.

Mentions: The pair-wise correlation coefficient of miRNA expression between the primary tumor and corresponding lymph node was significant for each patient (0.82, p < 0.0001), indicating that miRNA expression remained consistent between the primary lesion and local metastatic disease. In addition, the correlation coefficient within the same site, but between different patients, was 0.76 (p < 0.0001) for the tonsil, 0.83 (p < 0.00001) for the BOT and 0.90 (p < 0.0001) for the PNS. Overall, the similarity between patients in each sub-site was 0.79 (p < 0.0001). These data were subjected to Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using Partek® Genomics Suite software, version 6.4 Copyright© 2009, Partek Inc., St Louis, MO, USA [12]. Figure 1 shows the PCA and expression values for 5 representative miRNAs, which were significantly differentially expressed across samples.


microRNA evaluation of unknown primary lesions in the head and neck.

Barker EV, Cervigne NK, Reis PP, Goswami RS, Xu W, Weinreb I, Irish JC, Kamel-Reid S - Mol. Cancer (2009)

Principal component analysis based on the differential expression levels of 5 miRs (miR-137, miR-210, miR-200c, miR-213, and miR-622). These miRs showed the most significant differential expression according to each tumor site. The dot plots represent the relative expression levels of each miR across all sites.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2806863&req=5

Figure 1: Principal component analysis based on the differential expression levels of 5 miRs (miR-137, miR-210, miR-200c, miR-213, and miR-622). These miRs showed the most significant differential expression according to each tumor site. The dot plots represent the relative expression levels of each miR across all sites.
Mentions: The pair-wise correlation coefficient of miRNA expression between the primary tumor and corresponding lymph node was significant for each patient (0.82, p < 0.0001), indicating that miRNA expression remained consistent between the primary lesion and local metastatic disease. In addition, the correlation coefficient within the same site, but between different patients, was 0.76 (p < 0.0001) for the tonsil, 0.83 (p < 0.00001) for the BOT and 0.90 (p < 0.0001) for the PNS. Overall, the similarity between patients in each sub-site was 0.79 (p < 0.0001). These data were subjected to Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using Partek® Genomics Suite software, version 6.4 Copyright© 2009, Partek Inc., St Louis, MO, USA [12]. Figure 1 shows the PCA and expression values for 5 representative miRNAs, which were significantly differentially expressed across samples.

Bottom Line: Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression has been associated with both cancer progression and metastasis.As proof of principle, our study provides an indication that miRNA expression analysis may be useful to compare the primary lesion and local metastatic disease.This may be clinically relevant to predict the primary site of origin of metastatic disease, when the primary site remains obscure.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Molecular Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Ontario Cancer Institute and University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. emmabarker@doctors.org.uk

ABSTRACT
Unknown primary malignancy in the head and neck is not an infrequent diagnosis for patients with metastatic cervical lymph nodes. Although linked with a relatively good prognosis following radiation treatment, widespread radiation is coupled with significant morbidity. Altered microRNA (miRNA) expression has been associated with both cancer progression and metastasis. We sought to determine whether miRNA expression analysis could be used as a diagnostic tool to discover the primary site of malignancy, within the head and neck. We used quantitative real-time PCR to identify miRNA expression profiles of squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil, base of tongue and post-nasal space, as well as their corresponding metastatic lymph nodes, from 6 patients. Our results revealed that each cancer maintained its expression profile between the primary site and the nodal metastasis (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). In addition, each anatomical sub-site maintained a distinct miRNA profile between individual patients (r = 0.79, p < 0.0001). Finally, between sub-sites, the miRNA profiles were distinct (p < 0.0001). As proof of principle, our study provides an indication that miRNA expression analysis may be useful to compare the primary lesion and local metastatic disease. This may be clinically relevant to predict the primary site of origin of metastatic disease, when the primary site remains obscure.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus