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Temporal analysis of the incidence of meningitis in the Tehran metropolitan area, 1999-2005.

Mosavi-Jarrahi A, Esteghamati A, Asgari F, Heidarnia M, Mousavi-Jarrahi Y, Goya M - Popul Health Metr (2009)

Bottom Line: Referral cases (patients who did not reside in the Tehran metropolis) were excluded.The lowest incidence was among females aged 30 to 40 years at 0.72 cases per 100,000 population per year, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1.For periodicity, we found a peak of occurrence around the years 2000 and 2003.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Tehran, I. R. of Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the temporal determinants of meningitis incidence in the population living in the Tehran metropolis.

Methods: All cases of meningitis reported to health districts throughout the Tehran metropolis from 1999 to 2005 were abstracted from patient files. Referral cases (patients who did not reside in the Tehran metropolis) were excluded. For each year, sex- and age-specific incidences were estimated. Temporality and its determinants were analyzed using Poisson regression.

Results: Age-specific incidence is highest among males younger than 5 years of age at 10.2 cases per 100,000 population per year. The lowest incidence was among females aged 30 to 40 years at 0.72 cases per 100,000 population per year, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1. The temporal analysis showed seasonality, with a higher risk of meningitis in spring at a rate ratio of 1.31 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.20 to 1.41 and in autumn (rate ratio = 1.16, 95% CI 1.06, 1.27). For periodicity, we found a peak of occurrence around the years 2000 and 2003.

Conclusion: The epidemiology of meningitis in Iran follows similar patterns of age, sex, and seasonality distribution as found in other countries and populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The age-specific incidence of meningitis based on gender (incidences averaged over seven years). The values in the lines present the actual incidence values.
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Figure 1: The age-specific incidence of meningitis based on gender (incidences averaged over seven years). The values in the lines present the actual incidence values.

Mentions: Within the under-15 age group, the year 2000 with a total of 219 cases had the highest disease frequency, with a yearly incidence of 20.1 and 9.9 cases per 100,000 population for males and females, respectively. The year 2004 with a total of 91 cases was the lowest year in terms of disease frequency, with a yearly incidence of 9.2 and 4.5 per 100,000 population for males and females, respectively (Table 2). The age-specific incidence averaged over the study period (1999-2005 inclusive) showed the highest incidence among the male population less than 5 years of age, with average yearly incidence of 10.2 cases per 100,000 population, and the lowest incidence was among women aged 30-40 years, with average yearly incidence of 0.72 cases per 100,000 population. On average, the frequency of male cases was more than that of females, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1. Comparing the age-specific incidence curve between males and females, the age group 15-30 years showed the largest differences between the sexes (Figure 1).


Temporal analysis of the incidence of meningitis in the Tehran metropolitan area, 1999-2005.

Mosavi-Jarrahi A, Esteghamati A, Asgari F, Heidarnia M, Mousavi-Jarrahi Y, Goya M - Popul Health Metr (2009)

The age-specific incidence of meningitis based on gender (incidences averaged over seven years). The values in the lines present the actual incidence values.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2806853&req=5

Figure 1: The age-specific incidence of meningitis based on gender (incidences averaged over seven years). The values in the lines present the actual incidence values.
Mentions: Within the under-15 age group, the year 2000 with a total of 219 cases had the highest disease frequency, with a yearly incidence of 20.1 and 9.9 cases per 100,000 population for males and females, respectively. The year 2004 with a total of 91 cases was the lowest year in terms of disease frequency, with a yearly incidence of 9.2 and 4.5 per 100,000 population for males and females, respectively (Table 2). The age-specific incidence averaged over the study period (1999-2005 inclusive) showed the highest incidence among the male population less than 5 years of age, with average yearly incidence of 10.2 cases per 100,000 population, and the lowest incidence was among women aged 30-40 years, with average yearly incidence of 0.72 cases per 100,000 population. On average, the frequency of male cases was more than that of females, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1. Comparing the age-specific incidence curve between males and females, the age group 15-30 years showed the largest differences between the sexes (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Referral cases (patients who did not reside in the Tehran metropolis) were excluded.The lowest incidence was among females aged 30 to 40 years at 0.72 cases per 100,000 population per year, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1.For periodicity, we found a peak of occurrence around the years 2000 and 2003.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Tehran, I. R. of Iran.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the temporal determinants of meningitis incidence in the population living in the Tehran metropolis.

Methods: All cases of meningitis reported to health districts throughout the Tehran metropolis from 1999 to 2005 were abstracted from patient files. Referral cases (patients who did not reside in the Tehran metropolis) were excluded. For each year, sex- and age-specific incidences were estimated. Temporality and its determinants were analyzed using Poisson regression.

Results: Age-specific incidence is highest among males younger than 5 years of age at 10.2 cases per 100,000 population per year. The lowest incidence was among females aged 30 to 40 years at 0.72 cases per 100,000 population per year, with an overall male-to-female incidence ratio of 2.1. The temporal analysis showed seasonality, with a higher risk of meningitis in spring at a rate ratio of 1.31 with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.20 to 1.41 and in autumn (rate ratio = 1.16, 95% CI 1.06, 1.27). For periodicity, we found a peak of occurrence around the years 2000 and 2003.

Conclusion: The epidemiology of meningitis in Iran follows similar patterns of age, sex, and seasonality distribution as found in other countries and populations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus