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P66Shc signals to age.

Trinei M, Berniakovich I, Beltrami E, Migliaccio E, Fassina A, Pelicci P, Giorgio M - Aging (Albany NY) (2009)

Bottom Line: Oxygen metabolism is thought to impact on aging through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are supposed to damage biological molecules.The study of p66(Shc), a crucial regulator of ROS level involved in aging dysfunction, suggests that the incidence of degenerative disease and longevity are determined by a specific signaling function of ROS other than their unspecific damaging property.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Congenia Srl, 20139 Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Oxygen metabolism is thought to impact on aging through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are supposed to damage biological molecules. The study of p66(Shc), a crucial regulator of ROS level involved in aging dysfunction, suggests that the incidence of degenerative disease and longevity are determined by a specific signaling function of ROS other than their unspecific damaging property.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

P66 Shc/ROS                                                signaling determines fitness and aging associated dysfunctions.P66Shc/ROS                                            signals to specific functions that improve fitness whilst these same                                            functions may increase disease risk chronically (such as obesity related                                            disorders) and contribute to trigger p66Shc-mediated cell death.                                            Then, increased disease risk and cell loss rate contribute to aging dysfunctions.
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Figure 3: P66 Shc/ROS signaling determines fitness and aging associated dysfunctions.P66Shc/ROS signals to specific functions that improve fitness whilst these same functions may increase disease risk chronically (such as obesity related disorders) and contribute to trigger p66Shc-mediated cell death. Then, increased disease risk and cell loss rate contribute to aging dysfunctions.

Mentions: These findings of reduced adiposity in p66Shc-/- mice might have important implications for the effect of p66Shc on lifespan. Aging is associated with a pathological trait, often associated with obesity (metabolic syndrome), which predisposes to diabetes and cardiovascular diseases [30-34]. In humans, these diseases strongly affect morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly [30,35]. Oxidative stress has been implicated in a number of chronic disease states usually grouped under the umbrella of the metabolic syndrome [36-42], and it is thought to contribute to the aging process [43]. It has been hypothesized that the production of free radicals is dependent on metabolic rate [44], and that this may have an impact on the aging process. In p66Shc-/- mice, like in caloric restriction and FIRKO mice, fat deposits are moderately decreased [17,45], suggesting that reduced oxidative stress in p66Shc-/- mice might increase longevity through the direct effect of reduced adiposity. Notably, p66Shc-/- mice are more resistant to diabetes and have reduced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular damage upon HF-diet [18,25]. Therefore, the effect of p66Shc on aging might be considered a sort of chronic decay like the metabolic syndrome progression, although the contribution of the metabolic syndrome to life span is still not clear (Figure 3).


P66Shc signals to age.

Trinei M, Berniakovich I, Beltrami E, Migliaccio E, Fassina A, Pelicci P, Giorgio M - Aging (Albany NY) (2009)

P66 Shc/ROS                                                signaling determines fitness and aging associated dysfunctions.P66Shc/ROS                                            signals to specific functions that improve fitness whilst these same                                            functions may increase disease risk chronically (such as obesity related                                            disorders) and contribute to trigger p66Shc-mediated cell death.                                            Then, increased disease risk and cell loss rate contribute to aging dysfunctions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2806035&req=5

Figure 3: P66 Shc/ROS signaling determines fitness and aging associated dysfunctions.P66Shc/ROS signals to specific functions that improve fitness whilst these same functions may increase disease risk chronically (such as obesity related disorders) and contribute to trigger p66Shc-mediated cell death. Then, increased disease risk and cell loss rate contribute to aging dysfunctions.
Mentions: These findings of reduced adiposity in p66Shc-/- mice might have important implications for the effect of p66Shc on lifespan. Aging is associated with a pathological trait, often associated with obesity (metabolic syndrome), which predisposes to diabetes and cardiovascular diseases [30-34]. In humans, these diseases strongly affect morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly [30,35]. Oxidative stress has been implicated in a number of chronic disease states usually grouped under the umbrella of the metabolic syndrome [36-42], and it is thought to contribute to the aging process [43]. It has been hypothesized that the production of free radicals is dependent on metabolic rate [44], and that this may have an impact on the aging process. In p66Shc-/- mice, like in caloric restriction and FIRKO mice, fat deposits are moderately decreased [17,45], suggesting that reduced oxidative stress in p66Shc-/- mice might increase longevity through the direct effect of reduced adiposity. Notably, p66Shc-/- mice are more resistant to diabetes and have reduced risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular damage upon HF-diet [18,25]. Therefore, the effect of p66Shc on aging might be considered a sort of chronic decay like the metabolic syndrome progression, although the contribution of the metabolic syndrome to life span is still not clear (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Oxygen metabolism is thought to impact on aging through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are supposed to damage biological molecules.The study of p66(Shc), a crucial regulator of ROS level involved in aging dysfunction, suggests that the incidence of degenerative disease and longevity are determined by a specific signaling function of ROS other than their unspecific damaging property.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Congenia Srl, 20139 Milan, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Oxygen metabolism is thought to impact on aging through the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are supposed to damage biological molecules. The study of p66(Shc), a crucial regulator of ROS level involved in aging dysfunction, suggests that the incidence of degenerative disease and longevity are determined by a specific signaling function of ROS other than their unspecific damaging property.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus