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A quantitative analysis of the structure of human sternum.

Arbabi A - J Med Phys (2009)

Bottom Line: The percentage bone volume is 13.8 and the surface to volume ratio is 190 cm.Data on the structural variations within the whole sternum are presented.They show a percentage difference in bone volume between the manubrium and the body of sternum of about 36%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Physics, Imam Hosein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti Medical University, P. O. Box 14335-1419, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
An extensive study of the human sternum has been carried out to obtain estimates of the omnidirectional path-length distributions and structural parameters for trabeculation and marrow spaces. Data for sternum samples have been collected, using an object plane scanning microscope. These data have been used to produce the omnidirectional path-length distributions and values of structural parameters for the whole sternum. For a typical adult man the mean trabecular and marrow space path lengths are 224 and 1364 mum, respectively. The percentage bone volume is 13.8 and the surface to volume ratio is 190 cm. Data on the structural variations within the whole sternum are presented. They show a percentage difference in bone volume between the manubrium and the body of sternum of about 36%.

No MeSH data available.


Omnidirectional path length distributions, human adults' sternum
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Figure 0004: Omnidirectional path length distributions, human adults' sternum

Mentions: To produce omnidirectional path-length distributions, 30-μm-thick sections from each slice were scanned in five directions at 22.5° intervals, as shown in Figure 3b. These were found, by extensive scanning, to be adequate for obtaining a representative omnidirectional distribution of path lengths. The Leeds Automatic Bone Scanner (LABS) was used in the present investigation. For this work extensive reconstruction and recalibration have been made to the scanner, originally designed and constructed by Darley (1968 and 1972). For scanning a radiograph of a bone section is rotated on a turntable beneath a projection microscope and is scanned by a light beam. The radiograph substage moves radially across the turntable, at the same time rotation takes place, such that the light beam entering the microscope scans a series of arcs of constant radius across the bone. The magnified image of each scan is focused on an aperture, the reverse side of which is viewed by a photomultiplier. The duration of a light pulse entering the photomultiplier then measures the arc length traversed across a trabeculae (or marrow space), which does not differ significantly from the linear path length, because the scanning radius is very large compared with the length measured. The output pulses produced by the photomultiplier are proportional to the corresponding path lengths across the light features (marrow spaces or trabeculae, Figure 2) and are stored in a multichannel analyzer to produce a frequency distribution of path lengths. The average or general distribution can be calculated by normalizing and calculating the mean of the distributions of all the scans. To produce omnidirectional distributions, volume and solid-angle weightings were applied to the scans. The volume weighting factor is proportional to the relative marrow space or trabecular volume that is represented by the slice, and the solid-angle weighting allows for the fact that only particular directions in the structure are scanned. The omnidirectional path-length distributions for the four adult sternums studied are shown in Figure 4 for trabeculae and marrow spaces.


A quantitative analysis of the structure of human sternum.

Arbabi A - J Med Phys (2009)

Omnidirectional path length distributions, human adults' sternum
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2805894&req=5

Figure 0004: Omnidirectional path length distributions, human adults' sternum
Mentions: To produce omnidirectional path-length distributions, 30-μm-thick sections from each slice were scanned in five directions at 22.5° intervals, as shown in Figure 3b. These were found, by extensive scanning, to be adequate for obtaining a representative omnidirectional distribution of path lengths. The Leeds Automatic Bone Scanner (LABS) was used in the present investigation. For this work extensive reconstruction and recalibration have been made to the scanner, originally designed and constructed by Darley (1968 and 1972). For scanning a radiograph of a bone section is rotated on a turntable beneath a projection microscope and is scanned by a light beam. The radiograph substage moves radially across the turntable, at the same time rotation takes place, such that the light beam entering the microscope scans a series of arcs of constant radius across the bone. The magnified image of each scan is focused on an aperture, the reverse side of which is viewed by a photomultiplier. The duration of a light pulse entering the photomultiplier then measures the arc length traversed across a trabeculae (or marrow space), which does not differ significantly from the linear path length, because the scanning radius is very large compared with the length measured. The output pulses produced by the photomultiplier are proportional to the corresponding path lengths across the light features (marrow spaces or trabeculae, Figure 2) and are stored in a multichannel analyzer to produce a frequency distribution of path lengths. The average or general distribution can be calculated by normalizing and calculating the mean of the distributions of all the scans. To produce omnidirectional distributions, volume and solid-angle weightings were applied to the scans. The volume weighting factor is proportional to the relative marrow space or trabecular volume that is represented by the slice, and the solid-angle weighting allows for the fact that only particular directions in the structure are scanned. The omnidirectional path-length distributions for the four adult sternums studied are shown in Figure 4 for trabeculae and marrow spaces.

Bottom Line: The percentage bone volume is 13.8 and the surface to volume ratio is 190 cm.Data on the structural variations within the whole sternum are presented.They show a percentage difference in bone volume between the manubrium and the body of sternum of about 36%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Physics, Imam Hosein Hospital, Shahid Beheshti Medical University, P. O. Box 14335-1419, Tehran, Iran.

ABSTRACT
An extensive study of the human sternum has been carried out to obtain estimates of the omnidirectional path-length distributions and structural parameters for trabeculation and marrow spaces. Data for sternum samples have been collected, using an object plane scanning microscope. These data have been used to produce the omnidirectional path-length distributions and values of structural parameters for the whole sternum. For a typical adult man the mean trabecular and marrow space path lengths are 224 and 1364 mum, respectively. The percentage bone volume is 13.8 and the surface to volume ratio is 190 cm. Data on the structural variations within the whole sternum are presented. They show a percentage difference in bone volume between the manubrium and the body of sternum of about 36%.

No MeSH data available.