Limits...
Considerations in the use of ozone and PM(2.5) data for exposure assessment.

White WH - Air Qual Atmos Health (2009)

Bottom Line: The US national ambient-air monitoring network, created to verify compliance with health-based standards, now doubles as an important source of exposure data for the epidemiological analyses on which these standards increasingly rest, particularly in the case of ozone and PM(2.5).This paper was written for a workshop called to facilitate and inform the use of routine ozone and PM(2.5) data by the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.It examines the fit between priorities that shape regulatory monitoring and modeling and the data needs of public health tracking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, University of California, Davis, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
The US national ambient-air monitoring network, created to verify compliance with health-based standards, now doubles as an important source of exposure data for the epidemiological analyses on which these standards increasingly rest, particularly in the case of ozone and PM(2.5). This paper was written for a workshop called to facilitate and inform the use of routine ozone and PM(2.5) data by the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. It examines the fit between priorities that shape regulatory monitoring and modeling and the data needs of public health tracking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Right observed ozone deficit in the sulfur dioxide plume downwind of a power plant (adapted from White 1977). Regional background ozone is depleted within the plume by coemitted nitric oxide. Circles show ozone profile from a simple photostationary model. Below simulated NOx (left) and O3 (right) concentration fields in Houston from a CMAQ model run at 1 km grid resolution (adapted from Ching et al. 2006). Arterial roads show NOx excesses and O3 deficits, as do source regions to the southeast
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Fig1: Right observed ozone deficit in the sulfur dioxide plume downwind of a power plant (adapted from White 1977). Regional background ozone is depleted within the plume by coemitted nitric oxide. Circles show ozone profile from a simple photostationary model. Below simulated NOx (left) and O3 (right) concentration fields in Houston from a CMAQ model run at 1 km grid resolution (adapted from Ching et al. 2006). Arterial roads show NOx excesses and O3 deficits, as do source regions to the southeast

Mentions: Ozone is one of many oxidants participating in a system of photochemical reactions that involves nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and free radical intermediates. During daylight hours, these reactions commonly yield a gradual accumulation of total oxidants to which ozone is a major contributor. The proportion of ozone to other oxidants can vary greatly from one air parcel to another, as the fast reaction O3 + NO → O2 + NO2 of ozone with nitric oxide effectively replaces ozone with another oxidant, nitrogen dioxide. NO is the predominant nitrogen oxide produced by high-temperature combustion, so the near-source effect of combustion emissions is to depress ozone concentrations (Fig. 1). Monitoring strategies and exposure metrics for ozone are designed to minimize this masking by fresh emissions: the ozone NAAQS thus address the maximum concentrations recorded anywhere in an area by monitors set well back from roadways.Fig. 1


Considerations in the use of ozone and PM(2.5) data for exposure assessment.

White WH - Air Qual Atmos Health (2009)

Right observed ozone deficit in the sulfur dioxide plume downwind of a power plant (adapted from White 1977). Regional background ozone is depleted within the plume by coemitted nitric oxide. Circles show ozone profile from a simple photostationary model. Below simulated NOx (left) and O3 (right) concentration fields in Houston from a CMAQ model run at 1 km grid resolution (adapted from Ching et al. 2006). Arterial roads show NOx excesses and O3 deficits, as do source regions to the southeast
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2805789&req=5

Fig1: Right observed ozone deficit in the sulfur dioxide plume downwind of a power plant (adapted from White 1977). Regional background ozone is depleted within the plume by coemitted nitric oxide. Circles show ozone profile from a simple photostationary model. Below simulated NOx (left) and O3 (right) concentration fields in Houston from a CMAQ model run at 1 km grid resolution (adapted from Ching et al. 2006). Arterial roads show NOx excesses and O3 deficits, as do source regions to the southeast
Mentions: Ozone is one of many oxidants participating in a system of photochemical reactions that involves nitrogen oxides, hydrocarbons, and free radical intermediates. During daylight hours, these reactions commonly yield a gradual accumulation of total oxidants to which ozone is a major contributor. The proportion of ozone to other oxidants can vary greatly from one air parcel to another, as the fast reaction O3 + NO → O2 + NO2 of ozone with nitric oxide effectively replaces ozone with another oxidant, nitrogen dioxide. NO is the predominant nitrogen oxide produced by high-temperature combustion, so the near-source effect of combustion emissions is to depress ozone concentrations (Fig. 1). Monitoring strategies and exposure metrics for ozone are designed to minimize this masking by fresh emissions: the ozone NAAQS thus address the maximum concentrations recorded anywhere in an area by monitors set well back from roadways.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The US national ambient-air monitoring network, created to verify compliance with health-based standards, now doubles as an important source of exposure data for the epidemiological analyses on which these standards increasingly rest, particularly in the case of ozone and PM(2.5).This paper was written for a workshop called to facilitate and inform the use of routine ozone and PM(2.5) data by the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network.It examines the fit between priorities that shape regulatory monitoring and modeling and the data needs of public health tracking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Crocker Nuclear Laboratory, University of California, Davis, California, USA.

ABSTRACT
The US national ambient-air monitoring network, created to verify compliance with health-based standards, now doubles as an important source of exposure data for the epidemiological analyses on which these standards increasingly rest, particularly in the case of ozone and PM(2.5). This paper was written for a workshop called to facilitate and inform the use of routine ozone and PM(2.5) data by the Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. It examines the fit between priorities that shape regulatory monitoring and modeling and the data needs of public health tracking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus