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Accelerated idioventricular rhythm: history and chronology of the main discoveries.

Riera AR, Barros RB, de Sousa FD, Baranchuk A - Indian Pacing Electrophysiol J (2010)

Bottom Line: Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, with gradual onset and gradual termination.It can rarely manifest in patients with completely normal hearts or with structural heart disease.This manuscript aims to review the history of the main discoveries that lead to the identification and comprehension of this fascinating arrhythmia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ABC Medical Faculty. ABC Foundation. Santo Andre - Sao Paulo. Brazil. riera@uol.com.br

ABSTRACT
Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, with gradual onset and gradual termination. It can rarely manifest in patients with completely normal hearts or with structural heart disease. It is usually seen during acute myocardial infarction reperfusion. This manuscript aims to review the history of the main discoveries that lead to the identification and comprehension of this fascinating arrhythmia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

This ECG belongs to a 67 year-old woman, presenting to the ER with an acute inferior MI (superior panel). During the administration of thrombolytics, AIVR can be seen (inferior panel) at rate of 88 bpm. AIVR alternates with sinus captures (C) and fusion beats (F).
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Figure 2: This ECG belongs to a 67 year-old woman, presenting to the ER with an acute inferior MI (superior panel). During the administration of thrombolytics, AIVR can be seen (inferior panel) at rate of 88 bpm. AIVR alternates with sinus captures (C) and fusion beats (F).

Mentions: A typical example of AIVR in the setting of normal structural heart can be seen in Figure 1. In Figure 2, a case of AIVR in the context of a reperfused acute inferior MI can be seen.


Accelerated idioventricular rhythm: history and chronology of the main discoveries.

Riera AR, Barros RB, de Sousa FD, Baranchuk A - Indian Pacing Electrophysiol J (2010)

This ECG belongs to a 67 year-old woman, presenting to the ER with an acute inferior MI (superior panel). During the administration of thrombolytics, AIVR can be seen (inferior panel) at rate of 88 bpm. AIVR alternates with sinus captures (C) and fusion beats (F).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803604&req=5

Figure 2: This ECG belongs to a 67 year-old woman, presenting to the ER with an acute inferior MI (superior panel). During the administration of thrombolytics, AIVR can be seen (inferior panel) at rate of 88 bpm. AIVR alternates with sinus captures (C) and fusion beats (F).
Mentions: A typical example of AIVR in the setting of normal structural heart can be seen in Figure 1. In Figure 2, a case of AIVR in the context of a reperfused acute inferior MI can be seen.

Bottom Line: Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, with gradual onset and gradual termination.It can rarely manifest in patients with completely normal hearts or with structural heart disease.This manuscript aims to review the history of the main discoveries that lead to the identification and comprehension of this fascinating arrhythmia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ABC Medical Faculty. ABC Foundation. Santo Andre - Sao Paulo. Brazil. riera@uol.com.br

ABSTRACT
Accelerated Idioventricular Rhythm (AIVR) is a ventricular rhythm consisting of three or more consecutive monomorphic beats, with gradual onset and gradual termination. It can rarely manifest in patients with completely normal hearts or with structural heart disease. It is usually seen during acute myocardial infarction reperfusion. This manuscript aims to review the history of the main discoveries that lead to the identification and comprehension of this fascinating arrhythmia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus