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Resolution of cutaneous old world and new world leishmaniasis after oral miltefosine treatment.

Tappe D, Müller A, Stich A - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2010)

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Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene and Microbiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

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Cutaneous Old World leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in an Afghan woman. A, Initial presentation of the dry, plaque-like lesion with central nodule on the forearm. B, Intracellular parasites in vacuoles of a giant cell (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. C, Leishmania in macrophages (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.
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Figure 1: Cutaneous Old World leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in an Afghan woman. A, Initial presentation of the dry, plaque-like lesion with central nodule on the forearm. B, Intracellular parasites in vacuoles of a giant cell (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. C, Leishmania in macrophages (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.

Mentions: An Afghan migrant who had returned from a visit to the Middle East 2 years before was seen with a non-healing painless lesion on the forearm (Figure 1A). A skin biopsy showed intracellular Leishmania parasites in the subcutis (Figure 1B and C), and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive for Leishmania tropica. At the same time, a German traveler who had returned from a vacation to Central America 1 month before was seen with progressively ulcerating painless lesions on the ankle, thigh, and forearm (Figure 2A). Scarification of the lesions' margins showed sparse Leishmania amastigotes (Figure 2B and C) and the PCR from biopsies was positive for L. braziliensis. A 28-day treatment with oral miltefosine (2 mg and 2.5 mg/kg, respectively) was initiated in both individuals and the patients were seen at intervals of several weeks (Figures 3 and 4). All lesions healed, but both patients developed nausea and elevated liver function tests during pharmacotherapy. The highest values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were 66 U/L and 44 U/L in the female migrant and 73 U/L and 33 U/L in the male traveler, respectively. Bilirubin levels were normal in both patients, but the male patient developed γGT levels of 113 U/L. All values returned to normal 2 and 3 weeks after the end of treatment, respectively. Neither patient's lesions showed clinical relapse when examined 4 months after the end of therapy. Miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine) has been shown to be effective in cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis.1 At least some strains of L. braziliensis, a species that can cause both cutaneous and mucocutaneous disease in the New World, have demonstrated a decreased sensitivity to the drug in vitro, however.2


Resolution of cutaneous old world and new world leishmaniasis after oral miltefosine treatment.

Tappe D, Müller A, Stich A - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2010)

Cutaneous Old World leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in an Afghan woman. A, Initial presentation of the dry, plaque-like lesion with central nodule on the forearm. B, Intracellular parasites in vacuoles of a giant cell (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. C, Leishmania in macrophages (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803499&req=5

Figure 1: Cutaneous Old World leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica in an Afghan woman. A, Initial presentation of the dry, plaque-like lesion with central nodule on the forearm. B, Intracellular parasites in vacuoles of a giant cell (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. C, Leishmania in macrophages (arrowheads). Haematoxylin and eosin stain, magnification ×1,000. This figure appears in color at www.ajtmh.org.
Mentions: An Afghan migrant who had returned from a visit to the Middle East 2 years before was seen with a non-healing painless lesion on the forearm (Figure 1A). A skin biopsy showed intracellular Leishmania parasites in the subcutis (Figure 1B and C), and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was positive for Leishmania tropica. At the same time, a German traveler who had returned from a vacation to Central America 1 month before was seen with progressively ulcerating painless lesions on the ankle, thigh, and forearm (Figure 2A). Scarification of the lesions' margins showed sparse Leishmania amastigotes (Figure 2B and C) and the PCR from biopsies was positive for L. braziliensis. A 28-day treatment with oral miltefosine (2 mg and 2.5 mg/kg, respectively) was initiated in both individuals and the patients were seen at intervals of several weeks (Figures 3 and 4). All lesions healed, but both patients developed nausea and elevated liver function tests during pharmacotherapy. The highest values of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were 66 U/L and 44 U/L in the female migrant and 73 U/L and 33 U/L in the male traveler, respectively. Bilirubin levels were normal in both patients, but the male patient developed γGT levels of 113 U/L. All values returned to normal 2 and 3 weeks after the end of treatment, respectively. Neither patient's lesions showed clinical relapse when examined 4 months after the end of therapy. Miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine) has been shown to be effective in cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis.1 At least some strains of L. braziliensis, a species that can cause both cutaneous and mucocutaneous disease in the New World, have demonstrated a decreased sensitivity to the drug in vitro, however.2

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Hygiene and Microbiology, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. dtappe@hygiene.uni-wuerzburg.de

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus