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Print-and-peel fabrication for microfluidics: what's in it for biomedical applications?

Thomas MS, Millare B, Clift JM, Bao D, Hong C, Vullev VI - Ann Biomed Eng (2009)

Bottom Line: Microfluidics have, indeed, proven to be an indispensable toolkit for biological and biomedical research and development.Through accessibility to such methodologies for relatively fast and easy prototyping, PAP has the potential to considerably accelerate the impacts of microfluidics on the biological sciences and engineering.Comparative discussions of the different PAP techniques, along with the current challenges and approaches for addressing them, outline the perspectives for PAP and how it can be readily adopted by a broad range of scientists and engineers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.

ABSTRACT
This article reviews the development and the advances of print-and-peel (PAP) microfabrication. PAP techniques provide means for facile and expedient prototyping of microfluidic devices. Therefore, PAP has the potential for broadening the microfluidics technology by bringing it to researchers who lack regular or any accesses to specialized fabrication facilities and equipment. Microfluidics have, indeed, proven to be an indispensable toolkit for biological and biomedical research and development. Through accessibility to such methodologies for relatively fast and easy prototyping, PAP has the potential to considerably accelerate the impacts of microfluidics on the biological sciences and engineering. In summary, PAP encompasses: (1) direct printing of the masters for casting polymer device components; and (2) adding three-dimensional elements onto the masters for single-molding-step formation of channels and cavities within the bulk of the polymer slabs. Comparative discussions of the different PAP techniques, along with the current challenges and approaches for addressing them, outline the perspectives for PAP and how it can be readily adopted by a broad range of scientists and engineers.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Narrow junction along printed microchannel relief features. (a) a CAD image for the junction connection. (b, c) Reproduction of the CAD image, printed with a solid-ink printer (Xerox 8550D Phaser) on a overhead transparency film. The molten wax ink spreads between the edges of the two lines to form a narrow junction connection. (d) Topography of a junction (reproduced from profilometry measurements). The scale bars for (a)–(c) correspond to 100 μm
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Fig4: Narrow junction along printed microchannel relief features. (a) a CAD image for the junction connection. (b, c) Reproduction of the CAD image, printed with a solid-ink printer (Xerox 8550D Phaser) on a overhead transparency film. The molten wax ink spreads between the edges of the two lines to form a narrow junction connection. (d) Topography of a junction (reproduced from profilometry measurements). The scale bars for (a)–(c) correspond to 100 μm

Mentions: bContacts between spreading molten wax ink on the printed substrate allow for achieving dimensions below 100 μm (Fig. 4)


Print-and-peel fabrication for microfluidics: what's in it for biomedical applications?

Thomas MS, Millare B, Clift JM, Bao D, Hong C, Vullev VI - Ann Biomed Eng (2009)

Narrow junction along printed microchannel relief features. (a) a CAD image for the junction connection. (b, c) Reproduction of the CAD image, printed with a solid-ink printer (Xerox 8550D Phaser) on a overhead transparency film. The molten wax ink spreads between the edges of the two lines to form a narrow junction connection. (d) Topography of a junction (reproduced from profilometry measurements). The scale bars for (a)–(c) correspond to 100 μm
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803264&req=5

Fig4: Narrow junction along printed microchannel relief features. (a) a CAD image for the junction connection. (b, c) Reproduction of the CAD image, printed with a solid-ink printer (Xerox 8550D Phaser) on a overhead transparency film. The molten wax ink spreads between the edges of the two lines to form a narrow junction connection. (d) Topography of a junction (reproduced from profilometry measurements). The scale bars for (a)–(c) correspond to 100 μm
Mentions: bContacts between spreading molten wax ink on the printed substrate allow for achieving dimensions below 100 μm (Fig. 4)

Bottom Line: Microfluidics have, indeed, proven to be an indispensable toolkit for biological and biomedical research and development.Through accessibility to such methodologies for relatively fast and easy prototyping, PAP has the potential to considerably accelerate the impacts of microfluidics on the biological sciences and engineering.Comparative discussions of the different PAP techniques, along with the current challenges and approaches for addressing them, outline the perspectives for PAP and how it can be readily adopted by a broad range of scientists and engineers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.

ABSTRACT
This article reviews the development and the advances of print-and-peel (PAP) microfabrication. PAP techniques provide means for facile and expedient prototyping of microfluidic devices. Therefore, PAP has the potential for broadening the microfluidics technology by bringing it to researchers who lack regular or any accesses to specialized fabrication facilities and equipment. Microfluidics have, indeed, proven to be an indispensable toolkit for biological and biomedical research and development. Through accessibility to such methodologies for relatively fast and easy prototyping, PAP has the potential to considerably accelerate the impacts of microfluidics on the biological sciences and engineering. In summary, PAP encompasses: (1) direct printing of the masters for casting polymer device components; and (2) adding three-dimensional elements onto the masters for single-molding-step formation of channels and cavities within the bulk of the polymer slabs. Comparative discussions of the different PAP techniques, along with the current challenges and approaches for addressing them, outline the perspectives for PAP and how it can be readily adopted by a broad range of scientists and engineers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus