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Current techniques in postmortem imaging with specific attention to paediatric applications.

Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn T, van Rijn RR - Pediatr Radiol (2009)

Bottom Line: In this review we discuss the decline of and current controversies regarding conventional autopsies and the use of postmortem radiology as an adjunct to and a possible alternative for the conventional autopsy.We will address the radiological techniques and applications for postmortem imaging in children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam Zuid-Oost, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In this review we discuss the decline of and current controversies regarding conventional autopsies and the use of postmortem radiology as an adjunct to and a possible alternative for the conventional autopsy. We will address the radiological techniques and applications for postmortem imaging in children.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A 10-year-old boy who died in the hospital after a fall. a Postmortem CT shows a small pneumothorax, which was not found at autopsy. There is diffuse airway consolidation in keeping with postmortem pulmonary oedema. b Surface-shaded rendering of the thorax shows an incorrectly positioned left subclavian line with the tip of the line in the jugular vein (arrow). The line was cut and the distal end (arrowhead) was buried subcutaneously
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Fig10: A 10-year-old boy who died in the hospital after a fall. a Postmortem CT shows a small pneumothorax, which was not found at autopsy. There is diffuse airway consolidation in keeping with postmortem pulmonary oedema. b Surface-shaded rendering of the thorax shows an incorrectly positioned left subclavian line with the tip of the line in the jugular vein (arrow). The line was cut and the distal end (arrowhead) was buried subcutaneously

Mentions: One of the aims of postmortem forensic radiology is to detect the presence of foreign bodies, such as fragments of glass and bullets, and to describe their position and, if applicable, the trajectory they followed. Radiology will also be able to detect more subtle cases of pneumothorax or pneuperitoneum, for example, which can be missed in a conventional autopsy (Fig. 10). Furthermore, if radiology is used to describe the corpse prior to autopsy it makes revision possible even after the corpse has been buried. In legal proceedings this is an important advantage of postmortem radiology over the conventional autopsy.Fig. 10


Current techniques in postmortem imaging with specific attention to paediatric applications.

Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn T, van Rijn RR - Pediatr Radiol (2009)

A 10-year-old boy who died in the hospital after a fall. a Postmortem CT shows a small pneumothorax, which was not found at autopsy. There is diffuse airway consolidation in keeping with postmortem pulmonary oedema. b Surface-shaded rendering of the thorax shows an incorrectly positioned left subclavian line with the tip of the line in the jugular vein (arrow). The line was cut and the distal end (arrowhead) was buried subcutaneously
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803260&req=5

Fig10: A 10-year-old boy who died in the hospital after a fall. a Postmortem CT shows a small pneumothorax, which was not found at autopsy. There is diffuse airway consolidation in keeping with postmortem pulmonary oedema. b Surface-shaded rendering of the thorax shows an incorrectly positioned left subclavian line with the tip of the line in the jugular vein (arrow). The line was cut and the distal end (arrowhead) was buried subcutaneously
Mentions: One of the aims of postmortem forensic radiology is to detect the presence of foreign bodies, such as fragments of glass and bullets, and to describe their position and, if applicable, the trajectory they followed. Radiology will also be able to detect more subtle cases of pneumothorax or pneuperitoneum, for example, which can be missed in a conventional autopsy (Fig. 10). Furthermore, if radiology is used to describe the corpse prior to autopsy it makes revision possible even after the corpse has been buried. In legal proceedings this is an important advantage of postmortem radiology over the conventional autopsy.Fig. 10

Bottom Line: In this review we discuss the decline of and current controversies regarding conventional autopsies and the use of postmortem radiology as an adjunct to and a possible alternative for the conventional autopsy.We will address the radiological techniques and applications for postmortem imaging in children.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam Zuid-Oost, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In this review we discuss the decline of and current controversies regarding conventional autopsies and the use of postmortem radiology as an adjunct to and a possible alternative for the conventional autopsy. We will address the radiological techniques and applications for postmortem imaging in children.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus