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Identification of genes related to the development of bamboo rhizome bud.

Wang K, Peng H, Lin E, Jin Q, Hua X, Yao S, Bian H, Han N, Pan J, Wang J, Deng M, Zhu M - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Bottom Line: In the present study, the differences in anatomical structure among rhizome buds, rhizome shoots, and bamboo shoots were compared, and several genes related to the development of the bamboo rhizome bud were identified.The expression patterns of these genes revealed significant differences in rhizome shoots, rhizome buds, bamboo shoots, leaves, and young florets.To our knowledge, this is the first report that uses rice cross-species hybridization to identify genes related to bamboo rhizome bud development, and thereby contributes to the further understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in bamboo rhizome bud development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Key Laboratory for Cell and Gene Engineering of Zhejiang Province, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Bamboo (Phyllostachys praecox) is one of the largest members of the grass family Poaceae, and is one of the most economically important crops in Asia. However, complete knowledge of bamboo development and its molecular mechanisms is still lacking. In the present study, the differences in anatomical structure among rhizome buds, rhizome shoots, and bamboo shoots were compared, and several genes related to the development of the bamboo rhizome bud were identified. The rice cross-species microarray hybridization showed a total of 318 up-regulated and 339 down-regulated genes, including those involved in regulation and signalling, metabolism, and stress, and also cell wall-related genes, in the bamboo rhizome buds versus the leaves. By referring to the functional dissection of the homologous genes from Arabidopsis and rice, the putative functions of the 52 up-regulated genes in the bamboo rhizome bud were described. Six genes related to the development of the bamboo rhizome bud were further cloned and sequenced. These show 66-90% nucleotide identity and 68-98% amino acid identity with the homologous rice genes. The expression patterns of these genes revealed significant differences in rhizome shoots, rhizome buds, bamboo shoots, leaves, and young florets. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that the PpRLK1 gene is expressed in the procambium and is closely related to meristem development of bamboo shoots. The PpHB1 gene is expressed at the tips of bamboo shoots and procambium, and is closely related to rhizome bud formation and procambial development. To our knowledge, this is the first report that uses rice cross-species hybridization to identify genes related to bamboo rhizome bud development, and thereby contributes to the further understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in bamboo rhizome bud development.

Show MeSH
Anatomical comparison of the rhizome bud, bamboo shoot, and rhizome shoot during the development of Phyllostachys praecox. (A–C) Rhizome bud and its longitudinal section. (D–F) Bamboo shoot and its longitudinal section. (G–I) Rhizome shoot and its longitudinal section. Bar=100 μm.
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fig1: Anatomical comparison of the rhizome bud, bamboo shoot, and rhizome shoot during the development of Phyllostachys praecox. (A–C) Rhizome bud and its longitudinal section. (D–F) Bamboo shoot and its longitudinal section. (G–I) Rhizome shoot and its longitudinal section. Bar=100 μm.

Mentions: Rhizome buds of P. praecox usually develop into bamboo culms in spring and form new rhizomes in summer. Rhizome shoots and bamboo shoots are quite different in their anatomical structure, although they both originate from rhizome buds (Fig. 1). Regular meristems were observed on the tip of the rhizome buds, and many isolated procambia were found at the front of the rhizome shoots, corresponding to their ability for unlimited growth (Fig. 1A–C). However, the meristems on the tip of bamboo shoots were irregular, and no procambia were observed at the front. Interestingly, many lateral buds appeared on the sides of the bamboo shoots, implying that the bamboo shoot was a micro-miniature of the bamboo (Fig. 1D–F). Simultaneously, a few lateral smaller buds were observed on the sides of the rhizome shoots (Fig. 1G–I). These results suggest that the rhizome bud holds a key position for the rhizome shoot and/or bamboo shoot in differentiation and development.


Identification of genes related to the development of bamboo rhizome bud.

Wang K, Peng H, Lin E, Jin Q, Hua X, Yao S, Bian H, Han N, Pan J, Wang J, Deng M, Zhu M - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Anatomical comparison of the rhizome bud, bamboo shoot, and rhizome shoot during the development of Phyllostachys praecox. (A–C) Rhizome bud and its longitudinal section. (D–F) Bamboo shoot and its longitudinal section. (G–I) Rhizome shoot and its longitudinal section. Bar=100 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803224&req=5

fig1: Anatomical comparison of the rhizome bud, bamboo shoot, and rhizome shoot during the development of Phyllostachys praecox. (A–C) Rhizome bud and its longitudinal section. (D–F) Bamboo shoot and its longitudinal section. (G–I) Rhizome shoot and its longitudinal section. Bar=100 μm.
Mentions: Rhizome buds of P. praecox usually develop into bamboo culms in spring and form new rhizomes in summer. Rhizome shoots and bamboo shoots are quite different in their anatomical structure, although they both originate from rhizome buds (Fig. 1). Regular meristems were observed on the tip of the rhizome buds, and many isolated procambia were found at the front of the rhizome shoots, corresponding to their ability for unlimited growth (Fig. 1A–C). However, the meristems on the tip of bamboo shoots were irregular, and no procambia were observed at the front. Interestingly, many lateral buds appeared on the sides of the bamboo shoots, implying that the bamboo shoot was a micro-miniature of the bamboo (Fig. 1D–F). Simultaneously, a few lateral smaller buds were observed on the sides of the rhizome shoots (Fig. 1G–I). These results suggest that the rhizome bud holds a key position for the rhizome shoot and/or bamboo shoot in differentiation and development.

Bottom Line: In the present study, the differences in anatomical structure among rhizome buds, rhizome shoots, and bamboo shoots were compared, and several genes related to the development of the bamboo rhizome bud were identified.The expression patterns of these genes revealed significant differences in rhizome shoots, rhizome buds, bamboo shoots, leaves, and young florets.To our knowledge, this is the first report that uses rice cross-species hybridization to identify genes related to bamboo rhizome bud development, and thereby contributes to the further understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in bamboo rhizome bud development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, Key Laboratory for Cell and Gene Engineering of Zhejiang Province, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Bamboo (Phyllostachys praecox) is one of the largest members of the grass family Poaceae, and is one of the most economically important crops in Asia. However, complete knowledge of bamboo development and its molecular mechanisms is still lacking. In the present study, the differences in anatomical structure among rhizome buds, rhizome shoots, and bamboo shoots were compared, and several genes related to the development of the bamboo rhizome bud were identified. The rice cross-species microarray hybridization showed a total of 318 up-regulated and 339 down-regulated genes, including those involved in regulation and signalling, metabolism, and stress, and also cell wall-related genes, in the bamboo rhizome buds versus the leaves. By referring to the functional dissection of the homologous genes from Arabidopsis and rice, the putative functions of the 52 up-regulated genes in the bamboo rhizome bud were described. Six genes related to the development of the bamboo rhizome bud were further cloned and sequenced. These show 66-90% nucleotide identity and 68-98% amino acid identity with the homologous rice genes. The expression patterns of these genes revealed significant differences in rhizome shoots, rhizome buds, bamboo shoots, leaves, and young florets. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that the PpRLK1 gene is expressed in the procambium and is closely related to meristem development of bamboo shoots. The PpHB1 gene is expressed at the tips of bamboo shoots and procambium, and is closely related to rhizome bud formation and procambial development. To our knowledge, this is the first report that uses rice cross-species hybridization to identify genes related to bamboo rhizome bud development, and thereby contributes to the further understanding of the molecular mechanism involved in bamboo rhizome bud development.

Show MeSH