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Cellulose microfibril orientation of Picea abies and its variability at the micron-level determined by Raman imaging.

Gierlinger N, Luss S, König C, Konnerth J, Eder M, Fratzl P - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

Bottom Line: The functional characteristics of plant cell walls depend on the composition of the cell wall polymers, as well as on their highly ordered architecture at scales from a few nanometres to several microns.Raman spectra of wood acquired with linear polarized laser light include information about polymer composition as well as the alignment of cellulose microfibrils with respect to the fibre axis (microfibril angle).With the prerequisite of geometric sample and laser alignment, exact MFA prediction can complete the picture of the chemical cell wall design gained by the Raman imaging approach at the micron level in all plant tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johannes Kepler University Linz, Institute of Polymer Science, Altenberger Strasse 69, Linz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
The functional characteristics of plant cell walls depend on the composition of the cell wall polymers, as well as on their highly ordered architecture at scales from a few nanometres to several microns. Raman spectra of wood acquired with linear polarized laser light include information about polymer composition as well as the alignment of cellulose microfibrils with respect to the fibre axis (microfibril angle). By changing the laser polarization direction in 3 degrees steps, the dependency between cellulose and laser orientation direction was investigated. Orientation-dependent changes of band height ratios and spectra were described by quadratic linear regression and partial least square regressions, respectively. Using the models and regressions with high coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.99) microfibril orientation was predicted in the S1 and S2 layers distinguished by the Raman imaging approach in cross-sections of spruce normal, opposite, and compression wood. The determined microfibril angle (MFA) in the different S2 layers ranged from 0 degrees to 49.9 degrees and was in coincidence with X-ray diffraction determination. With the prerequisite of geometric sample and laser alignment, exact MFA prediction can complete the picture of the chemical cell wall design gained by the Raman imaging approach at the micron level in all plant tissues.

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(A–F) Changes in lignin amount (integral from 1542–1696 cm−1) in normal latewood (A), opposite (B), and compression wood (C) of spruce with the laser polarization direction parallel to the x-axis (green lines). Differences in cellulose orientation are visualized by integrating from 1063–1102 cm−1 (D–F) and spectra for microfibril angle prediction extracted separately from four tangential cell wall layers (1–4).
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fig6: (A–F) Changes in lignin amount (integral from 1542–1696 cm−1) in normal latewood (A), opposite (B), and compression wood (C) of spruce with the laser polarization direction parallel to the x-axis (green lines). Differences in cellulose orientation are visualized by integrating from 1063–1102 cm−1 (D–F) and spectra for microfibril angle prediction extracted separately from four tangential cell wall layers (1–4).

Mentions: Average microfibril angles (MFAs) in degrees predicted by the different Raman approaches from spectra of the tangential (tang) and radial (rad) S1 and S2 layer [extracted from the Raman images (Figs 5–6) of four different positions per layer parallel to the laser polarization direction] are compared among themselves and to the MFA determined (for the S2-layer) by X-ray diffraction (Gindl et al., 2004)


Cellulose microfibril orientation of Picea abies and its variability at the micron-level determined by Raman imaging.

Gierlinger N, Luss S, König C, Konnerth J, Eder M, Fratzl P - J. Exp. Bot. (2009)

(A–F) Changes in lignin amount (integral from 1542–1696 cm−1) in normal latewood (A), opposite (B), and compression wood (C) of spruce with the laser polarization direction parallel to the x-axis (green lines). Differences in cellulose orientation are visualized by integrating from 1063–1102 cm−1 (D–F) and spectra for microfibril angle prediction extracted separately from four tangential cell wall layers (1–4).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803219&req=5

fig6: (A–F) Changes in lignin amount (integral from 1542–1696 cm−1) in normal latewood (A), opposite (B), and compression wood (C) of spruce with the laser polarization direction parallel to the x-axis (green lines). Differences in cellulose orientation are visualized by integrating from 1063–1102 cm−1 (D–F) and spectra for microfibril angle prediction extracted separately from four tangential cell wall layers (1–4).
Mentions: Average microfibril angles (MFAs) in degrees predicted by the different Raman approaches from spectra of the tangential (tang) and radial (rad) S1 and S2 layer [extracted from the Raman images (Figs 5–6) of four different positions per layer parallel to the laser polarization direction] are compared among themselves and to the MFA determined (for the S2-layer) by X-ray diffraction (Gindl et al., 2004)

Bottom Line: The functional characteristics of plant cell walls depend on the composition of the cell wall polymers, as well as on their highly ordered architecture at scales from a few nanometres to several microns.Raman spectra of wood acquired with linear polarized laser light include information about polymer composition as well as the alignment of cellulose microfibrils with respect to the fibre axis (microfibril angle).With the prerequisite of geometric sample and laser alignment, exact MFA prediction can complete the picture of the chemical cell wall design gained by the Raman imaging approach at the micron level in all plant tissues.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Johannes Kepler University Linz, Institute of Polymer Science, Altenberger Strasse 69, Linz, Austria.

ABSTRACT
The functional characteristics of plant cell walls depend on the composition of the cell wall polymers, as well as on their highly ordered architecture at scales from a few nanometres to several microns. Raman spectra of wood acquired with linear polarized laser light include information about polymer composition as well as the alignment of cellulose microfibrils with respect to the fibre axis (microfibril angle). By changing the laser polarization direction in 3 degrees steps, the dependency between cellulose and laser orientation direction was investigated. Orientation-dependent changes of band height ratios and spectra were described by quadratic linear regression and partial least square regressions, respectively. Using the models and regressions with high coefficients of determination (R(2) > 0.99) microfibril orientation was predicted in the S1 and S2 layers distinguished by the Raman imaging approach in cross-sections of spruce normal, opposite, and compression wood. The determined microfibril angle (MFA) in the different S2 layers ranged from 0 degrees to 49.9 degrees and was in coincidence with X-ray diffraction determination. With the prerequisite of geometric sample and laser alignment, exact MFA prediction can complete the picture of the chemical cell wall design gained by the Raman imaging approach at the micron level in all plant tissues.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus