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Energy metabolism in Japanese patients with Crohn's disease.

Sasaki M, Johtatsu T, Kurihara M, Iwakawa H, Tanaka T, Tsujikawa T, Fujiyama Y, Andoh A - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2009)

Bottom Line: The mREEs in CD patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls (24.4 +/- 2.4 kcal/kg/day vs 21.3 +/- 1.7 kcal/kg/day).However, mREEs in CD patients were significantly lower than predicted REEs (pREEs) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation (26.4 +/- 2.5 kcal/kg/day).CD patients had hyper-metabolic statuses evaluated by mREE/body weight, but increased energy expenditure did not contribute to weight loss in these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Nutrition, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta-Tsukinowa, Otsu 520-2192, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated energy expenditure in hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease (CD), and determined optimal energy requirements for nutritional therapy. Sixteen patients (5 women and 11 men, mean age 36 year old, mean BMI 18.7 kg/m(2)) and 8 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) levels were determined by indirect calorimetry. The mREEs in CD patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls (24.4 +/- 2.4 kcal/kg/day vs 21.3 +/- 1.7 kcal/kg/day). However, mREEs in CD patients were significantly lower than predicted REEs (pREEs) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation (26.4 +/- 2.5 kcal/kg/day). Furthermore, mREE/pREE values were lower in undernourished patients than in well-nourished patients. CD patients had hyper-metabolic statuses evaluated by mREE/body weight, but increased energy expenditure did not contribute to weight loss in these patients. In conclusion, nutritional therapy with 25-30 kcal/ideal body weight/day (calculated by mREE x active factor) may be optimal for active CD patients, while higher energy intake values pose the risk of overfeeding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) by indirect calorimetry and predicted resting energy expenditure (pREE) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation in CD patients (n = 16). There is a positive correlation between mREE and pREE in CD patients.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: Correlation between measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) by indirect calorimetry and predicted resting energy expenditure (pREE) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation in CD patients (n = 16). There is a positive correlation between mREE and pREE in CD patients.

Mentions: In CD patients, mREE determined by indirect calorimetry was 1271 ± 181.7 kcal/day and pREE calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation was 1372.7 ± 143.7 kcal/day, respectively. As shown in Fig. 1, there were significant correlations between mREE and pREE in CD patients (p<0.001) as well as in healthy controls (p<0.05). Both mREE and pREE in CD patients were slightly lower than those of healthy controls, but there was no significant difference.


Energy metabolism in Japanese patients with Crohn's disease.

Sasaki M, Johtatsu T, Kurihara M, Iwakawa H, Tanaka T, Tsujikawa T, Fujiyama Y, Andoh A - J Clin Biochem Nutr (2009)

Correlation between measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) by indirect calorimetry and predicted resting energy expenditure (pREE) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation in CD patients (n = 16). There is a positive correlation between mREE and pREE in CD patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2803135&req=5

Figure 1: Correlation between measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) by indirect calorimetry and predicted resting energy expenditure (pREE) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation in CD patients (n = 16). There is a positive correlation between mREE and pREE in CD patients.
Mentions: In CD patients, mREE determined by indirect calorimetry was 1271 ± 181.7 kcal/day and pREE calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation was 1372.7 ± 143.7 kcal/day, respectively. As shown in Fig. 1, there were significant correlations between mREE and pREE in CD patients (p<0.001) as well as in healthy controls (p<0.05). Both mREE and pREE in CD patients were slightly lower than those of healthy controls, but there was no significant difference.

Bottom Line: The mREEs in CD patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls (24.4 +/- 2.4 kcal/kg/day vs 21.3 +/- 1.7 kcal/kg/day).However, mREEs in CD patients were significantly lower than predicted REEs (pREEs) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation (26.4 +/- 2.5 kcal/kg/day).CD patients had hyper-metabolic statuses evaluated by mREE/body weight, but increased energy expenditure did not contribute to weight loss in these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Nutrition, Shiga University of Medical Science, Seta-Tsukinowa, Otsu 520-2192, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We investigated energy expenditure in hospitalized patients with Crohn's disease (CD), and determined optimal energy requirements for nutritional therapy. Sixteen patients (5 women and 11 men, mean age 36 year old, mean BMI 18.7 kg/m(2)) and 8 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. Measured resting energy expenditure (mREE) levels were determined by indirect calorimetry. The mREEs in CD patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls (24.4 +/- 2.4 kcal/kg/day vs 21.3 +/- 1.7 kcal/kg/day). However, mREEs in CD patients were significantly lower than predicted REEs (pREEs) calculated by the Harris-Benedict equation (26.4 +/- 2.5 kcal/kg/day). Furthermore, mREE/pREE values were lower in undernourished patients than in well-nourished patients. CD patients had hyper-metabolic statuses evaluated by mREE/body weight, but increased energy expenditure did not contribute to weight loss in these patients. In conclusion, nutritional therapy with 25-30 kcal/ideal body weight/day (calculated by mREE x active factor) may be optimal for active CD patients, while higher energy intake values pose the risk of overfeeding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus