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Taxonomy and evolutionary relationships within species of section Rimosae (Inocybe) based on ITS, LSU and mtSSU sequence data.

Larsson E, Ryberg M, Moreau PA, Delcuse Mathiesen A, Jacobsson S - Persoonia (2009)

Bottom Line: The results indicate that recognizing Auritella on the genus level renders Inocybe paraphyletic.Rimosae were found to be distributed over two strongly supported clades, Maculata and Rimosae s.s.A key to the identified species of the Maculata and Rimosae s.s. clades which occur in Northwest Europe is provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 461, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden;

ABSTRACT
The present study aimed at elucidating the structure of Inocybe subg. Inosperma sect. Rimosae but included also representatives from subg. Mallocybe and the genus Auritella. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using ITS, LSU and mtSSU sequence data. The analyses recovered the ingroup as a monophyletic, strongly supported clade. The results indicate that recognizing Auritella on the genus level renders Inocybe paraphyletic. The species traditionally placed in sect. Rimosae were found to be distributed over two strongly supported clades, Maculata and Rimosae s.s. The Maculata clade clusters with sect. Cervicolores and the two represent subg. Inosperma in a strict sense. Rimosae s.s. emerges as an independent, supported clade well separated from Inosperma s.s. Twenty-one terminal groups were correlated with morphologically distinct species. In addition several taxa on single branches and minor less supported clades were recovered. A key to the identified species of the Maculata and Rimosae s.s. clades which occur in Northwest Europe is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bayesian 50 % majority-rule consensus phylogram. Bayesian posterior probabilities and bootstrap values above 70 % from the maximum parsimony analysis are indicated on branches. Recovered major clades are named and marked with a scale bar and minor supported clades discussed in the text have been numbered A–F. Conocybe siliginea was used to root the tree.
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Figure 1: Bayesian 50 % majority-rule consensus phylogram. Bayesian posterior probabilities and bootstrap values above 70 % from the maximum parsimony analysis are indicated on branches. Recovered major clades are named and marked with a scale bar and minor supported clades discussed in the text have been numbered A–F. Conocybe siliginea was used to root the tree.

Mentions: The Rimosae s.s. clade includes 68 sequences dispersed over 6 strongly supported subclades (Fig. 1A–F) and a number of groups that in most cases seem to correspond to species. Eight of these terminal groups have been identified as Inocybe arenicola, I. mimica, I. dulcamaroides, I. flavella, I. squamata, I. hygrophorus, I. obsoleta, and I. perlata, respectively. One distinct but non-identified clade is reported as Inocybe sp. Specimens identified as I. flavella seem to cover several taxa differing in the shape and size of spores. Small-spored specimens are together lumped as I. cfr flavella but this label seems to cover at least two taxa. Thirty-three sequences cluster to a strongly supported clade that corresponds to I. rimosa s.l. Within such a broadly defined I. rimosa five subclades corresponding to species were recovered. One is the alpine species I. bulbosissima, a second is I. rimosa s.s., a third is I. umbrinella, and the remaining two are tentatively identified as I. cfr sororia and I. melliolens. The specimens originating from deciduous forests in Australia form a strongly supported clade within Rimosae and represent two unidentified species. In addition several taxa on single branches and minor less supported clades were recovered (Fig. 1). These terminals may represent new species, either undescribed or described from other regions but not yet identified.


Taxonomy and evolutionary relationships within species of section Rimosae (Inocybe) based on ITS, LSU and mtSSU sequence data.

Larsson E, Ryberg M, Moreau PA, Delcuse Mathiesen A, Jacobsson S - Persoonia (2009)

Bayesian 50 % majority-rule consensus phylogram. Bayesian posterior probabilities and bootstrap values above 70 % from the maximum parsimony analysis are indicated on branches. Recovered major clades are named and marked with a scale bar and minor supported clades discussed in the text have been numbered A–F. Conocybe siliginea was used to root the tree.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2802730&req=5

Figure 1: Bayesian 50 % majority-rule consensus phylogram. Bayesian posterior probabilities and bootstrap values above 70 % from the maximum parsimony analysis are indicated on branches. Recovered major clades are named and marked with a scale bar and minor supported clades discussed in the text have been numbered A–F. Conocybe siliginea was used to root the tree.
Mentions: The Rimosae s.s. clade includes 68 sequences dispersed over 6 strongly supported subclades (Fig. 1A–F) and a number of groups that in most cases seem to correspond to species. Eight of these terminal groups have been identified as Inocybe arenicola, I. mimica, I. dulcamaroides, I. flavella, I. squamata, I. hygrophorus, I. obsoleta, and I. perlata, respectively. One distinct but non-identified clade is reported as Inocybe sp. Specimens identified as I. flavella seem to cover several taxa differing in the shape and size of spores. Small-spored specimens are together lumped as I. cfr flavella but this label seems to cover at least two taxa. Thirty-three sequences cluster to a strongly supported clade that corresponds to I. rimosa s.l. Within such a broadly defined I. rimosa five subclades corresponding to species were recovered. One is the alpine species I. bulbosissima, a second is I. rimosa s.s., a third is I. umbrinella, and the remaining two are tentatively identified as I. cfr sororia and I. melliolens. The specimens originating from deciduous forests in Australia form a strongly supported clade within Rimosae and represent two unidentified species. In addition several taxa on single branches and minor less supported clades were recovered (Fig. 1). These terminals may represent new species, either undescribed or described from other regions but not yet identified.

Bottom Line: The results indicate that recognizing Auritella on the genus level renders Inocybe paraphyletic.Rimosae were found to be distributed over two strongly supported clades, Maculata and Rimosae s.s.A key to the identified species of the Maculata and Rimosae s.s. clades which occur in Northwest Europe is provided.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, P.O. Box 461, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden;

ABSTRACT
The present study aimed at elucidating the structure of Inocybe subg. Inosperma sect. Rimosae but included also representatives from subg. Mallocybe and the genus Auritella. Phylogenetic relationships were inferred using ITS, LSU and mtSSU sequence data. The analyses recovered the ingroup as a monophyletic, strongly supported clade. The results indicate that recognizing Auritella on the genus level renders Inocybe paraphyletic. The species traditionally placed in sect. Rimosae were found to be distributed over two strongly supported clades, Maculata and Rimosae s.s. The Maculata clade clusters with sect. Cervicolores and the two represent subg. Inosperma in a strict sense. Rimosae s.s. emerges as an independent, supported clade well separated from Inosperma s.s. Twenty-one terminal groups were correlated with morphologically distinct species. In addition several taxa on single branches and minor less supported clades were recovered. A key to the identified species of the Maculata and Rimosae s.s. clades which occur in Northwest Europe is provided.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus