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Regulation of oxidative stress and cardioprotection in diabetes mellitus.

Hayashi T, Mori T, Yamashita C, Miyamura M - Curr Cardiol Rev (2008)

Bottom Line: On the other hand, the renin-angiotensin system is activated in diabetes, and local angiotensin II production may lead to oxidative damage via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor.Basic and clinical data indicate that angiotensin II receptor blockers have the potential to preserve left ventricular function and prevent cardiac remodeling that is exaggerated by oxidative stress in patients with diabetes.Thus, alleviation of oxidative stress might be one possible strategy in the treatment of diabetic patients associated with sleep apnea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine III, Osaka Medical College.

ABSTRACT
Analysis of the Framingham data has shown that the risk of heart failure is increased substantially among diabetic patients, while persons with the metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of both atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Sleep apnea may be related to the metabolic syndrome and systemic inflammation through hypoxia, which might also cause the cardiac remodeling by increased oxidative stress. On the other hand, the renin-angiotensin system is activated in diabetes, and local angiotensin II production may lead to oxidative damage via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Basic and clinical data indicate that angiotensin II receptor blockers have the potential to preserve left ventricular function and prevent cardiac remodeling that is exaggerated by oxidative stress in patients with diabetes. Thus, alleviation of oxidative stress might be one possible strategy in the treatment of diabetic patients associated with sleep apnea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative macrographs (A, B) and light micrographs (C, D) of hearts from the diabetic rats. The diabetic rats kept under normoxia exhibited nearly normal morphology (A, C). Hypoxia caused cardiac hypertrophy, disarrangement of myofibers, and increased interstitial fibrosis (B, D). original magnification; x 100.
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Figure 1: Representative macrographs (A, B) and light micrographs (C, D) of hearts from the diabetic rats. The diabetic rats kept under normoxia exhibited nearly normal morphology (A, C). Hypoxia caused cardiac hypertrophy, disarrangement of myofibers, and increased interstitial fibrosis (B, D). original magnification; x 100.

Mentions: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep that induce hypoxia. Coughlin et al. [41] reported that OSAS was closely associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and this syndrome contributes to the development of diabetes mellitus [2]. In addition, we previously reported that continuous exposure to hypoxia causes the acceleration of myocardial degeneration in diabetic rats [42] (Figs. 1 and 2). These findings suggest that a strong relationship may exist between OSAS and diabetes.


Regulation of oxidative stress and cardioprotection in diabetes mellitus.

Hayashi T, Mori T, Yamashita C, Miyamura M - Curr Cardiol Rev (2008)

Representative macrographs (A, B) and light micrographs (C, D) of hearts from the diabetic rats. The diabetic rats kept under normoxia exhibited nearly normal morphology (A, C). Hypoxia caused cardiac hypertrophy, disarrangement of myofibers, and increased interstitial fibrosis (B, D). original magnification; x 100.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801856&req=5

Figure 1: Representative macrographs (A, B) and light micrographs (C, D) of hearts from the diabetic rats. The diabetic rats kept under normoxia exhibited nearly normal morphology (A, C). Hypoxia caused cardiac hypertrophy, disarrangement of myofibers, and increased interstitial fibrosis (B, D). original magnification; x 100.
Mentions: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep that induce hypoxia. Coughlin et al. [41] reported that OSAS was closely associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and this syndrome contributes to the development of diabetes mellitus [2]. In addition, we previously reported that continuous exposure to hypoxia causes the acceleration of myocardial degeneration in diabetic rats [42] (Figs. 1 and 2). These findings suggest that a strong relationship may exist between OSAS and diabetes.

Bottom Line: On the other hand, the renin-angiotensin system is activated in diabetes, and local angiotensin II production may lead to oxidative damage via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor.Basic and clinical data indicate that angiotensin II receptor blockers have the potential to preserve left ventricular function and prevent cardiac remodeling that is exaggerated by oxidative stress in patients with diabetes.Thus, alleviation of oxidative stress might be one possible strategy in the treatment of diabetic patients associated with sleep apnea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine III, Osaka Medical College.

ABSTRACT
Analysis of the Framingham data has shown that the risk of heart failure is increased substantially among diabetic patients, while persons with the metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of both atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus. Sleep apnea may be related to the metabolic syndrome and systemic inflammation through hypoxia, which might also cause the cardiac remodeling by increased oxidative stress. On the other hand, the renin-angiotensin system is activated in diabetes, and local angiotensin II production may lead to oxidative damage via the angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Basic and clinical data indicate that angiotensin II receptor blockers have the potential to preserve left ventricular function and prevent cardiac remodeling that is exaggerated by oxidative stress in patients with diabetes. Thus, alleviation of oxidative stress might be one possible strategy in the treatment of diabetic patients associated with sleep apnea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus