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The molecular mechanisms of transition between mesenchymal and amoeboid invasiveness in tumor cells.

Panková K, Rösel D, Novotný M, Brábek J - Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: The focus is on the signaling of the Rho family of small GTPases that regulate the cytoskeleton-dependent processes taking place during the cell migration.The multiple interactions among the Rho family of proteins, their regulators and effectors are thought to be the key determinants of the particular type of invasiveness.Mesenchymal and amoeboid invasive strategies display different adhesive and proteolytical interactions with the surrounding matrix and the alterations influencing these interactions can also lead to the transitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Tumor cells exhibit at least two distinct modes of migration when invading the 3D environment. A single tumor cell's invasive strategy follows either mesenchymal or amoeboid patterns. Certain cell types can use both modes of invasiveness and undergo transitions between them. This work outlines the signaling pathways involved in mesenchymal and amoeboid types of tumor cell motility and summarizes the molecular mechanisms that are involved in transitions between them. The focus is on the signaling of the Rho family of small GTPases that regulate the cytoskeleton-dependent processes taking place during the cell migration. The multiple interactions among the Rho family of proteins, their regulators and effectors are thought to be the key determinants of the particular type of invasiveness. Mesenchymal and amoeboid invasive strategies display different adhesive and proteolytical interactions with the surrounding matrix and the alterations influencing these interactions can also lead to the transitions.

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Different morphologies of the invasive tumor cells. Left mesenchymal morphology of K4 sarcoma cells. Right amoeboid morphology of A3 sarcoma cells (representative modulation contrast image recorded at an invasion depth of 50 μm)
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Fig1: Different morphologies of the invasive tumor cells. Left mesenchymal morphology of K4 sarcoma cells. Right amoeboid morphology of A3 sarcoma cells (representative modulation contrast image recorded at an invasion depth of 50 μm)

Mentions: The mesenchymal type of tumor cell migration can be compared to fibroblast-like motility. Apart from fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and some tumor cells also use this mode of migration. Cells with the mesenchymal type of motility have a specific elongated spindle-like shape. In 3D matrices, cells are polarized, creating an obvious leading edge with one or more leading pseudopods and the lagging cell body (containing nucleus, cytoplasm, and organelles) that can be easily distinguished (see Fig. 1).Fig. 1


The molecular mechanisms of transition between mesenchymal and amoeboid invasiveness in tumor cells.

Panková K, Rösel D, Novotný M, Brábek J - Cell. Mol. Life Sci. (2009)

Different morphologies of the invasive tumor cells. Left mesenchymal morphology of K4 sarcoma cells. Right amoeboid morphology of A3 sarcoma cells (representative modulation contrast image recorded at an invasion depth of 50 μm)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801846&req=5

Fig1: Different morphologies of the invasive tumor cells. Left mesenchymal morphology of K4 sarcoma cells. Right amoeboid morphology of A3 sarcoma cells (representative modulation contrast image recorded at an invasion depth of 50 μm)
Mentions: The mesenchymal type of tumor cell migration can be compared to fibroblast-like motility. Apart from fibroblasts, keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and some tumor cells also use this mode of migration. Cells with the mesenchymal type of motility have a specific elongated spindle-like shape. In 3D matrices, cells are polarized, creating an obvious leading edge with one or more leading pseudopods and the lagging cell body (containing nucleus, cytoplasm, and organelles) that can be easily distinguished (see Fig. 1).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The focus is on the signaling of the Rho family of small GTPases that regulate the cytoskeleton-dependent processes taking place during the cell migration.The multiple interactions among the Rho family of proteins, their regulators and effectors are thought to be the key determinants of the particular type of invasiveness.Mesenchymal and amoeboid invasive strategies display different adhesive and proteolytical interactions with the surrounding matrix and the alterations influencing these interactions can also lead to the transitions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Tumor cells exhibit at least two distinct modes of migration when invading the 3D environment. A single tumor cell's invasive strategy follows either mesenchymal or amoeboid patterns. Certain cell types can use both modes of invasiveness and undergo transitions between them. This work outlines the signaling pathways involved in mesenchymal and amoeboid types of tumor cell motility and summarizes the molecular mechanisms that are involved in transitions between them. The focus is on the signaling of the Rho family of small GTPases that regulate the cytoskeleton-dependent processes taking place during the cell migration. The multiple interactions among the Rho family of proteins, their regulators and effectors are thought to be the key determinants of the particular type of invasiveness. Mesenchymal and amoeboid invasive strategies display different adhesive and proteolytical interactions with the surrounding matrix and the alterations influencing these interactions can also lead to the transitions.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus