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The impact of multiple malignancies on patients with bladder carcinoma: a population-based study using the SEER database.

Ehrlich JR, Schwartz MJ, Ng CK, Kauffman EC, Scherr DS - Adv Urol (2009)

Bottom Line: However, when cohorts were substratified by stage, patients in the high-stage BS cohort appeared to have a survival advantage over high-stage BO patients.The survival advantage of high-stage BS patients is likely a statistical phenomenon.Such findings are important to shape future research and to improve our understanding of patients with multiple malignancies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 525 East 68th Street, Starr 900, New York, NY 10021, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To date, no study has examined a population-based registry to determine the impact of multiple malignancies on survival of bladder cancer patients. Our experience suggests that bladder cancer patients with multiple malignancies may have relatively positive outcomes.

Materials & methods: We utilized data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEERs) database to examine survival between patients with only bladder cancer (BO) and with bladder cancer and additional cancer(s) antecedent (AB), subsequent (BS), or antecedent and subsequent to bladder cancer (ABS).

Results: Analyses demonstrated diminished survival among AB and ABS cohorts. However, when cohorts were substratified by stage, patients in the high-stage BS cohort appeared to have a survival advantage over high-stage BO patients.

Conclusions: Bladder cancer patients with multiple malignancies have diminished survival. The survival advantage of high-stage BS patients is likely a statistical phenomenon. Such findings are important to shape future research and to improve our understanding of patients with multiple malignancies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier curves comparing  (a) overall,  (b) cancer-specific and  (c) bladder cancer-specific survival of bladder cancer only and BS patients with data censored at a 10-year endpoint.
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fig1: Kaplan-Meier curves comparing (a) overall, (b) cancer-specific and (c) bladder cancer-specific survival of bladder cancer only and BS patients with data censored at a 10-year endpoint.

Mentions: KM curves and univariate analyses show that the BO group has an overall survival advantage at 5- and 10 years against all multiple malignancy cohorts except for the BS group (Figure 1, Table 2). Our finding that the BS group had the greatest overall survival advantage at 5 years and yet the BO group had this advantage at the 10-year endpoint led us to construct a Cox proportional hazards model in order to more effectively analyze survival controlling for age, sex, race, grade, stage, and year of diagnosis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that BO patients have an overall and cancer-specific survival advantage at 5- and 10 years over the AB and ABS groups, but not over BS patients; BS patients had an increased overall and decreased cancer-specific survival compared to the BO group (Table 3).


The impact of multiple malignancies on patients with bladder carcinoma: a population-based study using the SEER database.

Ehrlich JR, Schwartz MJ, Ng CK, Kauffman EC, Scherr DS - Adv Urol (2009)

Kaplan-Meier curves comparing  (a) overall,  (b) cancer-specific and  (c) bladder cancer-specific survival of bladder cancer only and BS patients with data censored at a 10-year endpoint.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801451&req=5

fig1: Kaplan-Meier curves comparing (a) overall, (b) cancer-specific and (c) bladder cancer-specific survival of bladder cancer only and BS patients with data censored at a 10-year endpoint.
Mentions: KM curves and univariate analyses show that the BO group has an overall survival advantage at 5- and 10 years against all multiple malignancy cohorts except for the BS group (Figure 1, Table 2). Our finding that the BS group had the greatest overall survival advantage at 5 years and yet the BO group had this advantage at the 10-year endpoint led us to construct a Cox proportional hazards model in order to more effectively analyze survival controlling for age, sex, race, grade, stage, and year of diagnosis. Multivariate analysis confirmed that BO patients have an overall and cancer-specific survival advantage at 5- and 10 years over the AB and ABS groups, but not over BS patients; BS patients had an increased overall and decreased cancer-specific survival compared to the BO group (Table 3).

Bottom Line: However, when cohorts were substratified by stage, patients in the high-stage BS cohort appeared to have a survival advantage over high-stage BO patients.The survival advantage of high-stage BS patients is likely a statistical phenomenon.Such findings are important to shape future research and to improve our understanding of patients with multiple malignancies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 525 East 68th Street, Starr 900, New York, NY 10021, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To date, no study has examined a population-based registry to determine the impact of multiple malignancies on survival of bladder cancer patients. Our experience suggests that bladder cancer patients with multiple malignancies may have relatively positive outcomes.

Materials & methods: We utilized data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEERs) database to examine survival between patients with only bladder cancer (BO) and with bladder cancer and additional cancer(s) antecedent (AB), subsequent (BS), or antecedent and subsequent to bladder cancer (ABS).

Results: Analyses demonstrated diminished survival among AB and ABS cohorts. However, when cohorts were substratified by stage, patients in the high-stage BS cohort appeared to have a survival advantage over high-stage BO patients.

Conclusions: Bladder cancer patients with multiple malignancies have diminished survival. The survival advantage of high-stage BS patients is likely a statistical phenomenon. Such findings are important to shape future research and to improve our understanding of patients with multiple malignancies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus