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Non-verbal sound processing in the primary progressive aphasias.

Goll JC, Crutch SJ, Loo JH, Rohrer JD, Frost C, Bamiou DE, Warren JD - Brain (2009)

Bottom Line: Little is known about the processing of non-verbal sounds in the primary progressive aphasias.Patients with primary progressive aphasia had deficits of non-verbal sound analysis compared with healthy age-matched individuals.These findings argue for the existence of core disorders of complex non-verbal sound perception and recognition in primary progressive aphasia and specific disorders at perceptual and semantic levels of cortical auditory processing in progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the processing of non-verbal sounds in the primary progressive aphasias. Here, we investigated the processing of complex non-verbal sounds in detail, in a consecutive series of 20 patients with primary progressive aphasia [12 with progressive non-fluent aphasia; eight with semantic dementia]. We designed a novel experimental neuropsychological battery to probe complex sound processing at early perceptual, apperceptive and semantic levels, using within-modality response procedures that minimized other cognitive demands and matching tests in the visual modality. Patients with primary progressive aphasia had deficits of non-verbal sound analysis compared with healthy age-matched individuals. Deficits of auditory early perceptual analysis were more common in progressive non-fluent aphasia, deficits of apperceptive processing occurred in both progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia, and deficits of semantic processing also occurred in both syndromes, but were relatively modality specific in progressive non-fluent aphasia and part of a more severe generic semantic deficit in semantic dementia. Patients with progressive non-fluent aphasia were more likely to show severe auditory than visual deficits as compared to patients with semantic dementia. These findings argue for the existence of core disorders of complex non-verbal sound perception and recognition in primary progressive aphasia and specific disorders at perceptual and semantic levels of cortical auditory processing in progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia, respectively.

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Schematic of experimental stimuli and presentation sequences (A and B). Schematics of auditory and visual early perceptual stimuli, and the presentation sequence used. (C) Schematic of spectral inversion of a complex sound, as used in the auditory apperceptive test. (D and E) Examples of auditory and visual semantic stimulus pairs, and a schematic of the presentation sequence used. t = time (s).
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Figure 1: Schematic of experimental stimuli and presentation sequences (A and B). Schematics of auditory and visual early perceptual stimuli, and the presentation sequence used. (C) Schematic of spectral inversion of a complex sound, as used in the auditory apperceptive test. (D and E) Examples of auditory and visual semantic stimulus pairs, and a schematic of the presentation sequence used. t = time (s).

Mentions: This test was designed to assess early perceptual processing of auditory stimuli beyond the level of elementary sensory encoding in the auditory periphery, based on the discrimination of complex sound properties. Most natural sounds contain energy distributed across multiple frequencies with variable energy (intensity). This patterning of frequency and intensity is the ‘spectral shape’ of the sound (Warren et al., 2005a) and is presented schematically in Fig. 1A. Spectral shape is one important determinant of timbre, a key factor in the perception of sound identity. Since spectral shape perception necessitates the integration of intensity information across multiple frequency bands, it is operationally analogous to shape perception in vision, which requires the integration of information across two (spatial) dimensions. Here, we designed tests to manipulate shape information in auditory and visual objects, respectively.Figure 1


Non-verbal sound processing in the primary progressive aphasias.

Goll JC, Crutch SJ, Loo JH, Rohrer JD, Frost C, Bamiou DE, Warren JD - Brain (2009)

Schematic of experimental stimuli and presentation sequences (A and B). Schematics of auditory and visual early perceptual stimuli, and the presentation sequence used. (C) Schematic of spectral inversion of a complex sound, as used in the auditory apperceptive test. (D and E) Examples of auditory and visual semantic stimulus pairs, and a schematic of the presentation sequence used. t = time (s).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801322&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic of experimental stimuli and presentation sequences (A and B). Schematics of auditory and visual early perceptual stimuli, and the presentation sequence used. (C) Schematic of spectral inversion of a complex sound, as used in the auditory apperceptive test. (D and E) Examples of auditory and visual semantic stimulus pairs, and a schematic of the presentation sequence used. t = time (s).
Mentions: This test was designed to assess early perceptual processing of auditory stimuli beyond the level of elementary sensory encoding in the auditory periphery, based on the discrimination of complex sound properties. Most natural sounds contain energy distributed across multiple frequencies with variable energy (intensity). This patterning of frequency and intensity is the ‘spectral shape’ of the sound (Warren et al., 2005a) and is presented schematically in Fig. 1A. Spectral shape is one important determinant of timbre, a key factor in the perception of sound identity. Since spectral shape perception necessitates the integration of intensity information across multiple frequency bands, it is operationally analogous to shape perception in vision, which requires the integration of information across two (spatial) dimensions. Here, we designed tests to manipulate shape information in auditory and visual objects, respectively.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Little is known about the processing of non-verbal sounds in the primary progressive aphasias.Patients with primary progressive aphasia had deficits of non-verbal sound analysis compared with healthy age-matched individuals.These findings argue for the existence of core disorders of complex non-verbal sound perception and recognition in primary progressive aphasia and specific disorders at perceptual and semantic levels of cortical auditory processing in progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dementia Research Centre, Institute of Neurology, University College London, Queen Square, London WC1N 3BG, UK.

ABSTRACT
Little is known about the processing of non-verbal sounds in the primary progressive aphasias. Here, we investigated the processing of complex non-verbal sounds in detail, in a consecutive series of 20 patients with primary progressive aphasia [12 with progressive non-fluent aphasia; eight with semantic dementia]. We designed a novel experimental neuropsychological battery to probe complex sound processing at early perceptual, apperceptive and semantic levels, using within-modality response procedures that minimized other cognitive demands and matching tests in the visual modality. Patients with primary progressive aphasia had deficits of non-verbal sound analysis compared with healthy age-matched individuals. Deficits of auditory early perceptual analysis were more common in progressive non-fluent aphasia, deficits of apperceptive processing occurred in both progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia, and deficits of semantic processing also occurred in both syndromes, but were relatively modality specific in progressive non-fluent aphasia and part of a more severe generic semantic deficit in semantic dementia. Patients with progressive non-fluent aphasia were more likely to show severe auditory than visual deficits as compared to patients with semantic dementia. These findings argue for the existence of core disorders of complex non-verbal sound perception and recognition in primary progressive aphasia and specific disorders at perceptual and semantic levels of cortical auditory processing in progressive non-fluent aphasia and semantic dementia, respectively.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus