Limits...
Applying research to public health questions: timing and the environmentally relevant dose.

Birnbaum LS - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The mission of National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is to improve the health of the American people by understanding the role of environmental exposures in disease and dysfunction... Thus, NIEHS-sponsored research must play an important role in understanding disease etiology... In the last few years there have been workshops, manuscripts, and even society-position papers indicating that increased use of environmental health science data by policy makers should lead to reductions in the human burden of disease... NIEHS researchers are turning their attention to the “environmentally relevant dose,” which is the dose in the range of typical human exposure as measured in tissue, blood, and urine of study subjects... In 2007, the NIEHS invited a panel of experts to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, for a scientific review of all literature published on bisphenol A (BPA)... The expert panel then issued a consensus statement (vom ), which concluded that low environmentally relevant doses of BPA could cause numerous diseases in animal models, and that there was evidence for both low-dose effects and for nonmonotonic dose–response relationships... Overall, similar conclusions were reached by the National Toxicology Program’s Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction, which focused on the developmental and reproductive effects of BPA... An article in this issue of Environmental Health Perspectives highlights this discussion of low-dose effects and notes that nonmonotonic, or biphasic, dose–response curves are commonly observed in endocrinology... This suggests that high doses may not be appropriate to predict the safety of low doses when hormonally active or modulating compounds are studied... Their conclusions are supported by the position statement published by... There are now low-dose data not only on BPA but also on phthalates, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, perchlorate, and some diverse pesticides such as hexachlorobenzene and atrazine.

Show MeSH
Linda S. Birnbaum
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801180&req=5

f1-ehp-117-a478: Linda S. Birnbaum


Applying research to public health questions: timing and the environmentally relevant dose.

Birnbaum LS - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Linda S. Birnbaum
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801180&req=5

f1-ehp-117-a478: Linda S. Birnbaum

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The mission of National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is to improve the health of the American people by understanding the role of environmental exposures in disease and dysfunction... Thus, NIEHS-sponsored research must play an important role in understanding disease etiology... In the last few years there have been workshops, manuscripts, and even society-position papers indicating that increased use of environmental health science data by policy makers should lead to reductions in the human burden of disease... NIEHS researchers are turning their attention to the “environmentally relevant dose,” which is the dose in the range of typical human exposure as measured in tissue, blood, and urine of study subjects... In 2007, the NIEHS invited a panel of experts to Chapel Hill, North Carolina, for a scientific review of all literature published on bisphenol A (BPA)... The expert panel then issued a consensus statement (vom ), which concluded that low environmentally relevant doses of BPA could cause numerous diseases in animal models, and that there was evidence for both low-dose effects and for nonmonotonic dose–response relationships... Overall, similar conclusions were reached by the National Toxicology Program’s Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction, which focused on the developmental and reproductive effects of BPA... An article in this issue of Environmental Health Perspectives highlights this discussion of low-dose effects and notes that nonmonotonic, or biphasic, dose–response curves are commonly observed in endocrinology... This suggests that high doses may not be appropriate to predict the safety of low doses when hormonally active or modulating compounds are studied... Their conclusions are supported by the position statement published by... There are now low-dose data not only on BPA but also on phthalates, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dioxins, heavy metals such as lead and mercury, perchlorate, and some diverse pesticides such as hexachlorobenzene and atrazine.

Show MeSH