Limits...
Environmental health indicators of climate change for the United States: findings from the State Environmental Health Indicator Collaborative.

English PB, Sinclair AH, Ross Z, Anderson H, Boothe V, Davis C, Ebi K, Kagey B, Malecki K, Shultz R, Simms E - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Bottom Line: We present a list of surveillance indicators for practitioners and policy makers that include climate-sensitive health outcomes and environmental and vulnerability indicators, as well as mitigation, adaptation, and policy indicators of climate change.A review of environmental health indicators for climate change shows that data exist for many of these measures, but more evaluation of their sensitivity and usefulness is needed.Further attention is necessary to increase data quality and availability and to develop new surveillance databases, especially for climate-sensitive morbidity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, California 94804, USA. penglish@dhs.ca.gov.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To develop public health adaptation strategies and to project the impacts of climate change on human health, indicators of vulnerability and preparedness along with accurate surveillance data on climate-sensitive health outcomes are needed. We researched and developed environmental health indicators for inputs into human health vulnerability assessments for climate change and to propose public health preventative actions.

Data sources: We conducted a review of the scientific literature to identify outcomes and actions that were related to climate change. Data sources included governmental and nongovernmental agencies and the published literature.

Data extraction: Sources were identified and assessed for completeness, usability, and accuracy. Priority was then given to identifying longitudinal data sets that were applicable at the state and community level.

Data synthesis: We present a list of surveillance indicators for practitioners and policy makers that include climate-sensitive health outcomes and environmental and vulnerability indicators, as well as mitigation, adaptation, and policy indicators of climate change.

Conclusions: A review of environmental health indicators for climate change shows that data exist for many of these measures, but more evaluation of their sensitivity and usefulness is needed. Further attention is necessary to increase data quality and availability and to develop new surveillance databases, especially for climate-sensitive morbidity.

Show MeSH
Population by U.S. county within 5 km of the coast with “very high” vulnerability to sea level rise. Data from the USGS (2000) and U.S. Census (2000).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801164&req=5

f1-ehp-117-1673: Population by U.S. county within 5 km of the coast with “very high” vulnerability to sea level rise. Data from the USGS (2000) and U.S. Census (2000).

Mentions: The USGS has developed an index of coastal vulnerability to future sea-level rise, which incorporates tidal range, wave height, coastal slope, shoreline erosion rates, geomorphology, and historical rates of sea-level rise (Thieler 2000). Coastal vulnerability is ranked from low to very high. We used the coastal vulnerability index and population data and boundaries for coastal census block groups for the contiguous United States to create a measure that provides a general indication of the population living in close proximity to high-risk areas. Figure 1 shows the population by county within 5 km of coast with “very high” vulnerability to sea level rise. Areas in California and Florida show the greatest populations at risk.


Environmental health indicators of climate change for the United States: findings from the State Environmental Health Indicator Collaborative.

English PB, Sinclair AH, Ross Z, Anderson H, Boothe V, Davis C, Ebi K, Kagey B, Malecki K, Shultz R, Simms E - Environ. Health Perspect. (2009)

Population by U.S. county within 5 km of the coast with “very high” vulnerability to sea level rise. Data from the USGS (2000) and U.S. Census (2000).
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801164&req=5

f1-ehp-117-1673: Population by U.S. county within 5 km of the coast with “very high” vulnerability to sea level rise. Data from the USGS (2000) and U.S. Census (2000).
Mentions: The USGS has developed an index of coastal vulnerability to future sea-level rise, which incorporates tidal range, wave height, coastal slope, shoreline erosion rates, geomorphology, and historical rates of sea-level rise (Thieler 2000). Coastal vulnerability is ranked from low to very high. We used the coastal vulnerability index and population data and boundaries for coastal census block groups for the contiguous United States to create a measure that provides a general indication of the population living in close proximity to high-risk areas. Figure 1 shows the population by county within 5 km of coast with “very high” vulnerability to sea level rise. Areas in California and Florida show the greatest populations at risk.

Bottom Line: We present a list of surveillance indicators for practitioners and policy makers that include climate-sensitive health outcomes and environmental and vulnerability indicators, as well as mitigation, adaptation, and policy indicators of climate change.A review of environmental health indicators for climate change shows that data exist for many of these measures, but more evaluation of their sensitivity and usefulness is needed.Further attention is necessary to increase data quality and availability and to develop new surveillance databases, especially for climate-sensitive morbidity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, California Department of Public Health, Richmond, California 94804, USA. penglish@dhs.ca.gov.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To develop public health adaptation strategies and to project the impacts of climate change on human health, indicators of vulnerability and preparedness along with accurate surveillance data on climate-sensitive health outcomes are needed. We researched and developed environmental health indicators for inputs into human health vulnerability assessments for climate change and to propose public health preventative actions.

Data sources: We conducted a review of the scientific literature to identify outcomes and actions that were related to climate change. Data sources included governmental and nongovernmental agencies and the published literature.

Data extraction: Sources were identified and assessed for completeness, usability, and accuracy. Priority was then given to identifying longitudinal data sets that were applicable at the state and community level.

Data synthesis: We present a list of surveillance indicators for practitioners and policy makers that include climate-sensitive health outcomes and environmental and vulnerability indicators, as well as mitigation, adaptation, and policy indicators of climate change.

Conclusions: A review of environmental health indicators for climate change shows that data exist for many of these measures, but more evaluation of their sensitivity and usefulness is needed. Further attention is necessary to increase data quality and availability and to develop new surveillance databases, especially for climate-sensitive morbidity.

Show MeSH