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Efficacy of strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection and vertical transmission against Brucella abortus in Sprague-Dawley rats.

Islam MA, Khatun MM, Baek BK, Lee SI - J. Vet. Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: Immunizing animals in the wild against Brucella (B.) abortus is essential to control bovine brucellosis because cattle can get the disease through close contact with infected wildlife.The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection as well as vertical transmission in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats against B. abortus biotype 1.This is the first report of RB51 vaccination efficacy against the vertical transmission of B. abortus in the SD rat model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Korean Zoonoses Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Immunizing animals in the wild against Brucella (B.) abortus is essential to control bovine brucellosis because cattle can get the disease through close contact with infected wildlife. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection as well as vertical transmission in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats against B. abortus biotype 1. Virgin female SD rats (n = 48) two months of age were divided into two groups: one group (n = 24) received RB51 vaccine intraperitoneally with 3 x 10(10) colony forming units (CFU) and the other group (n = 24) was used as non-vaccinated control. Non-vaccinated and RB51-vaccinated rats were challenged with 1.5 x 10(9) CFU of virulent B. abortus biotype 1 six weeks after vaccination. Three weeks after challenge, all rats were bred. Verification of RB51-vaccine induced protection in SD rats was determined by bacteriological, serological and molecular screening of maternal and fetal tissues at necropsy. The RB51 vaccine elicited 81.25% protection in SD rats against infection with B. abortus biotype 1. Offspring from rats vaccinated with RB51 had a decreased (p < 0.05) prevalence of vertical transmission of B. abortus biotype 1 compared to the offspring from non-vaccinated rats (20.23% and 87.50%, respectively). This is the first report of RB51 vaccination efficacy against the vertical transmission of B. abortus in the SD rat model.

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Total serum IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a levels of non-vaccinated control and RB51-vaccinated rats 3 weeks after challenge with B. abortus biotype 1 (A) and at necropsy (B). Antibody titers are reported as mean ± SE. Statistically significant difference among RB51-vaccinated, non-vaccinated pregnant and non-pregnant control rats are indicated by asterisks (*p < 0.05 and †p < 0.001).
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Figure 3: Total serum IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a levels of non-vaccinated control and RB51-vaccinated rats 3 weeks after challenge with B. abortus biotype 1 (A) and at necropsy (B). Antibody titers are reported as mean ± SE. Statistically significant difference among RB51-vaccinated, non-vaccinated pregnant and non-pregnant control rats are indicated by asterisks (*p < 0.05 and †p < 0.001).

Mentions: Sera of four randomly selected rats in the RB51-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups were seronegative prior to challenge by RBPAT, standard tube agglutination test and ELISA. On the day of breeding (3 weeks post-challenge), sera of four randomly selected rats from the RB51-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups showed anti-B. abortus antibody responses in RBPAT, tube agglutination test and ELISA. The RB51-vaccinated rats had significantly lower (p < 0.05) standard tube agglutination titers at 3 weeks post-challenge when compared to non-vaccinated rats (Fig. 2). At necropsy, 3 of 16 RB51-vaccinated rats were seroconverted according to RBPAT, standard tube agglutination test and ELISA. All rats in the non-vaccinated group showed B. abortus specific antibody responses at necropsy and pregnant rats in this group had lower (p < 0.05) standard tube agglutination titers (314 ± 26) when compared to the non-pregnant rats (411 ± 11). The RB51-vaccinated rats had significantly lower (p < 0.001) standard tube agglutination titers (83 ± 14) when compared to non-vaccinated rats at necropsy (Fig. 2). Our ELISA data also showed significantly lower (p < 0.001) IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a titers in the sera of RB51-vaccinated rats compared to non-vaccinated control rats at 3 weeks post challenge or at necropsy (Fig. 3).


Efficacy of strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection and vertical transmission against Brucella abortus in Sprague-Dawley rats.

Islam MA, Khatun MM, Baek BK, Lee SI - J. Vet. Sci. (2009)

Total serum IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a levels of non-vaccinated control and RB51-vaccinated rats 3 weeks after challenge with B. abortus biotype 1 (A) and at necropsy (B). Antibody titers are reported as mean ± SE. Statistically significant difference among RB51-vaccinated, non-vaccinated pregnant and non-pregnant control rats are indicated by asterisks (*p < 0.05 and †p < 0.001).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: Total serum IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a levels of non-vaccinated control and RB51-vaccinated rats 3 weeks after challenge with B. abortus biotype 1 (A) and at necropsy (B). Antibody titers are reported as mean ± SE. Statistically significant difference among RB51-vaccinated, non-vaccinated pregnant and non-pregnant control rats are indicated by asterisks (*p < 0.05 and †p < 0.001).
Mentions: Sera of four randomly selected rats in the RB51-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups were seronegative prior to challenge by RBPAT, standard tube agglutination test and ELISA. On the day of breeding (3 weeks post-challenge), sera of four randomly selected rats from the RB51-vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups showed anti-B. abortus antibody responses in RBPAT, tube agglutination test and ELISA. The RB51-vaccinated rats had significantly lower (p < 0.05) standard tube agglutination titers at 3 weeks post-challenge when compared to non-vaccinated rats (Fig. 2). At necropsy, 3 of 16 RB51-vaccinated rats were seroconverted according to RBPAT, standard tube agglutination test and ELISA. All rats in the non-vaccinated group showed B. abortus specific antibody responses at necropsy and pregnant rats in this group had lower (p < 0.05) standard tube agglutination titers (314 ± 26) when compared to the non-pregnant rats (411 ± 11). The RB51-vaccinated rats had significantly lower (p < 0.001) standard tube agglutination titers (83 ± 14) when compared to non-vaccinated rats at necropsy (Fig. 2). Our ELISA data also showed significantly lower (p < 0.001) IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a titers in the sera of RB51-vaccinated rats compared to non-vaccinated control rats at 3 weeks post challenge or at necropsy (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Immunizing animals in the wild against Brucella (B.) abortus is essential to control bovine brucellosis because cattle can get the disease through close contact with infected wildlife.The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection as well as vertical transmission in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats against B. abortus biotype 1.This is the first report of RB51 vaccination efficacy against the vertical transmission of B. abortus in the SD rat model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Korean Zoonoses Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Immunizing animals in the wild against Brucella (B.) abortus is essential to control bovine brucellosis because cattle can get the disease through close contact with infected wildlife. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the B. abortus strain RB51 vaccine in protecting infection as well as vertical transmission in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats against B. abortus biotype 1. Virgin female SD rats (n = 48) two months of age were divided into two groups: one group (n = 24) received RB51 vaccine intraperitoneally with 3 x 10(10) colony forming units (CFU) and the other group (n = 24) was used as non-vaccinated control. Non-vaccinated and RB51-vaccinated rats were challenged with 1.5 x 10(9) CFU of virulent B. abortus biotype 1 six weeks after vaccination. Three weeks after challenge, all rats were bred. Verification of RB51-vaccine induced protection in SD rats was determined by bacteriological, serological and molecular screening of maternal and fetal tissues at necropsy. The RB51 vaccine elicited 81.25% protection in SD rats against infection with B. abortus biotype 1. Offspring from rats vaccinated with RB51 had a decreased (p < 0.05) prevalence of vertical transmission of B. abortus biotype 1 compared to the offspring from non-vaccinated rats (20.23% and 87.50%, respectively). This is the first report of RB51 vaccination efficacy against the vertical transmission of B. abortus in the SD rat model.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus