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Survey of Helicobacter infection in domestic and feral cats in Korea.

Ghil HM, Yoo JH, Jung WS, Chung TH, Youn HY, Hwang CY - J. Vet. Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: Saliva and feces were evaluated by Helicobacter genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Genus-specific PCR positive samples were further evaluated for H. felis and H. pylori using specific primer pairs.H. felis and H. pylori species-specific PCR was uniformly negative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Discovery of Helicobacter (H.) pylori has led to a fundamental change in our understanding of gastric diseases in humans. Previous studies have found various Helicobacter spp. in dogs and cats, and pets have been questioned as a zoonotic carrier. The present study surveyed the Helicobacter infections and investigated the presence of H. felis and H. pylori infections in domestic and feral cats in Korea. Sixty-four domestic cats and 101 feral cats were selected from an animal shelter. Saliva and feces were evaluated by Helicobacter genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genus-specific PCR positive samples were further evaluated for H. felis and H. pylori using specific primer pairs. Thirty-six of 64 (56.3%) samples from domestic cats and 92 of 101 (91.1%) samples from feral cats were PCR positive; the positive rate of feces samples was higher than that of saliva samples in both groups. H. felis and H. pylori species-specific PCR was uniformly negative. The prevalence of Helicobacter spp. in feral cats was approximately two-fold higher than that of domestic cats. The fecal-oral route may be more a common transmission route not only between cats but also in humans.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

PCR amplication of Helicobacter (H.) spp. genus-specific 16S rRNA gene. DNA molecular weight standard marker (Lane 1), H. felis positive control (ATCC 49179) of DNA product at 400 bps (Lane 2), negative control (Lane 3), feces of feral cats no.92-101 (Lanes 4-13) are shown.
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Figure 1: PCR amplication of Helicobacter (H.) spp. genus-specific 16S rRNA gene. DNA molecular weight standard marker (Lane 1), H. felis positive control (ATCC 49179) of DNA product at 400 bps (Lane 2), negative control (Lane 3), feces of feral cats no.92-101 (Lanes 4-13) are shown.

Mentions: On Helicobacter genus-specific PCR for 16s rRNA gene, 36 (56.3%) from 64 domestic cats were positive, and 92 (91.1%) from 101 feral cats were positive on either saliva or feces samples (Fig. 1). In domestic cats, 17 (26.6%) saliva samples and 29 (45.3%) feces samples were positive. Infection rates were higher in feral cats with 47 (46.5%) saliva samples and 85 (84.2%) feces samples being positive (Table 2). Among the 64 domestic cats for which the clinical status was known, 36 (56.3%) were positive for Helicobacter spp. infection. Clinically ill cats had a Helicobacter spp. infection rate of 63.4% (26/41), compared to 43.5% (10/23) of healthy cats, which was not statistically significant. Ill cats were not especially prone to gastrointestinal diseases, and their diagnoses mainly involved anorexia with or without hepatic lipidosis, feline urologic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, feline infectious peritonitis, lymphoma, and otitis.


Survey of Helicobacter infection in domestic and feral cats in Korea.

Ghil HM, Yoo JH, Jung WS, Chung TH, Youn HY, Hwang CY - J. Vet. Sci. (2009)

PCR amplication of Helicobacter (H.) spp. genus-specific 16S rRNA gene. DNA molecular weight standard marker (Lane 1), H. felis positive control (ATCC 49179) of DNA product at 400 bps (Lane 2), negative control (Lane 3), feces of feral cats no.92-101 (Lanes 4-13) are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801104&req=5

Figure 1: PCR amplication of Helicobacter (H.) spp. genus-specific 16S rRNA gene. DNA molecular weight standard marker (Lane 1), H. felis positive control (ATCC 49179) of DNA product at 400 bps (Lane 2), negative control (Lane 3), feces of feral cats no.92-101 (Lanes 4-13) are shown.
Mentions: On Helicobacter genus-specific PCR for 16s rRNA gene, 36 (56.3%) from 64 domestic cats were positive, and 92 (91.1%) from 101 feral cats were positive on either saliva or feces samples (Fig. 1). In domestic cats, 17 (26.6%) saliva samples and 29 (45.3%) feces samples were positive. Infection rates were higher in feral cats with 47 (46.5%) saliva samples and 85 (84.2%) feces samples being positive (Table 2). Among the 64 domestic cats for which the clinical status was known, 36 (56.3%) were positive for Helicobacter spp. infection. Clinically ill cats had a Helicobacter spp. infection rate of 63.4% (26/41), compared to 43.5% (10/23) of healthy cats, which was not statistically significant. Ill cats were not especially prone to gastrointestinal diseases, and their diagnoses mainly involved anorexia with or without hepatic lipidosis, feline urologic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, renal failure, feline infectious peritonitis, lymphoma, and otitis.

Bottom Line: Saliva and feces were evaluated by Helicobacter genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Genus-specific PCR positive samples were further evaluated for H. felis and H. pylori using specific primer pairs.H. felis and H. pylori species-specific PCR was uniformly negative.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Discovery of Helicobacter (H.) pylori has led to a fundamental change in our understanding of gastric diseases in humans. Previous studies have found various Helicobacter spp. in dogs and cats, and pets have been questioned as a zoonotic carrier. The present study surveyed the Helicobacter infections and investigated the presence of H. felis and H. pylori infections in domestic and feral cats in Korea. Sixty-four domestic cats and 101 feral cats were selected from an animal shelter. Saliva and feces were evaluated by Helicobacter genus-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Genus-specific PCR positive samples were further evaluated for H. felis and H. pylori using specific primer pairs. Thirty-six of 64 (56.3%) samples from domestic cats and 92 of 101 (91.1%) samples from feral cats were PCR positive; the positive rate of feces samples was higher than that of saliva samples in both groups. H. felis and H. pylori species-specific PCR was uniformly negative. The prevalence of Helicobacter spp. in feral cats was approximately two-fold higher than that of domestic cats. The fecal-oral route may be more a common transmission route not only between cats but also in humans.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus