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Multilobular tumour of the caudal cranium causing severe cerebral and cerebellar compression in a dog.

Psychas V, Loukopoulos P, Polizopoulou ZS, Sofianidis G - J. Vet. Sci. (2009)

Bottom Line: Histologically, it was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage and separated by fibrous septae, features typical of MTB.Lung metastases were evident.To our knowledge, this is the first report of an MTB causing both severe cerebral and cerebellar compression and the second detailed report of an MTB of the occipital bone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pathology Laboratory, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT
Multilobular tumour of bone (MTB) is an uncommon tumour and is usually located in the skull. A 13-year-old mixed breed dog was presented with a two-week history of progressively worsening vestibular dysfunction and cognitive abnormalities; it appeared demented and showed asymmetric ataxia and hypermetria of all limbs. The owner opted to have the animal euthanised. Necropsy revealed a large mass occupying the right occipital, parietal and temporal bones, severely compressing the cerebellum and the right occipital lobe. Histologically, it was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage and separated by fibrous septae, features typical of MTB. Lung metastases were evident. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an MTB causing both severe cerebral and cerebellar compression and the second detailed report of an MTB of the occipital bone. MTB should be included in the differential diagnosis of bone tumours as well as in cases with central vestibular disease.

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Primary (A, B, C) and secondary (D) multilobular tumour of bone. Note the dominant presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid tissue (C: left) or cartilage (C: right) and separated by fibrous septa, a feature typical of the multilobular tumour of bone. In marginal areas (C), the lobules were not as well formed and the tumour cells were in places arranged in sheets, features denoting a high-grade malignancy. (D) Metastatic focus in the lungs retaining the multilobular pattern, albeit forming lobules that were smaller and of more uniform size. H&E stain, (A) decalcified section. Scale bars = A: 260 µm, B: 104 µm, C: 52 µm, D: 260 µm.
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Figure 2: Primary (A, B, C) and secondary (D) multilobular tumour of bone. Note the dominant presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid tissue (C: left) or cartilage (C: right) and separated by fibrous septa, a feature typical of the multilobular tumour of bone. In marginal areas (C), the lobules were not as well formed and the tumour cells were in places arranged in sheets, features denoting a high-grade malignancy. (D) Metastatic focus in the lungs retaining the multilobular pattern, albeit forming lobules that were smaller and of more uniform size. H&E stain, (A) decalcified section. Scale bars = A: 260 µm, B: 104 µm, C: 52 µm, D: 260 µm.

Mentions: Histologically, the tumour was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage in the center that were separated by anastomosing fibrous septae (Figs. 2A and B). Similar to its macroscopic appearance, there was no evidence of the tumour invading into the neighbouring tissues. Overall, the tumour was well-differentiated. Most lobules were small to medium in size and round or oval. The lobules contained cartilage, osteoid or bone in their centers and were with or without chondrocytes or osteocytes in their lacunae. Also, the lobules had a variably sized layer of chondroblasts or osteoblasts, surrounded by a thin fibrous septum, both oriented radially around the matrix-containing center.


Multilobular tumour of the caudal cranium causing severe cerebral and cerebellar compression in a dog.

Psychas V, Loukopoulos P, Polizopoulou ZS, Sofianidis G - J. Vet. Sci. (2009)

Primary (A, B, C) and secondary (D) multilobular tumour of bone. Note the dominant presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid tissue (C: left) or cartilage (C: right) and separated by fibrous septa, a feature typical of the multilobular tumour of bone. In marginal areas (C), the lobules were not as well formed and the tumour cells were in places arranged in sheets, features denoting a high-grade malignancy. (D) Metastatic focus in the lungs retaining the multilobular pattern, albeit forming lobules that were smaller and of more uniform size. H&E stain, (A) decalcified section. Scale bars = A: 260 µm, B: 104 µm, C: 52 µm, D: 260 µm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2801101&req=5

Figure 2: Primary (A, B, C) and secondary (D) multilobular tumour of bone. Note the dominant presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid tissue (C: left) or cartilage (C: right) and separated by fibrous septa, a feature typical of the multilobular tumour of bone. In marginal areas (C), the lobules were not as well formed and the tumour cells were in places arranged in sheets, features denoting a high-grade malignancy. (D) Metastatic focus in the lungs retaining the multilobular pattern, albeit forming lobules that were smaller and of more uniform size. H&E stain, (A) decalcified section. Scale bars = A: 260 µm, B: 104 µm, C: 52 µm, D: 260 µm.
Mentions: Histologically, the tumour was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage in the center that were separated by anastomosing fibrous septae (Figs. 2A and B). Similar to its macroscopic appearance, there was no evidence of the tumour invading into the neighbouring tissues. Overall, the tumour was well-differentiated. Most lobules were small to medium in size and round or oval. The lobules contained cartilage, osteoid or bone in their centers and were with or without chondrocytes or osteocytes in their lacunae. Also, the lobules had a variably sized layer of chondroblasts or osteoblasts, surrounded by a thin fibrous septum, both oriented radially around the matrix-containing center.

Bottom Line: Histologically, it was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage and separated by fibrous septae, features typical of MTB.Lung metastases were evident.To our knowledge, this is the first report of an MTB causing both severe cerebral and cerebellar compression and the second detailed report of an MTB of the occipital bone.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pathology Laboratory, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT
Multilobular tumour of bone (MTB) is an uncommon tumour and is usually located in the skull. A 13-year-old mixed breed dog was presented with a two-week history of progressively worsening vestibular dysfunction and cognitive abnormalities; it appeared demented and showed asymmetric ataxia and hypermetria of all limbs. The owner opted to have the animal euthanised. Necropsy revealed a large mass occupying the right occipital, parietal and temporal bones, severely compressing the cerebellum and the right occipital lobe. Histologically, it was characterised by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid or cartilage and separated by fibrous septae, features typical of MTB. Lung metastases were evident. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an MTB causing both severe cerebral and cerebellar compression and the second detailed report of an MTB of the occipital bone. MTB should be included in the differential diagnosis of bone tumours as well as in cases with central vestibular disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus