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The efficacy of topical diphencyprone in the treatment of alopecia areata.

Maryam A, Hassan S, Farshad F, Parastoo B, Vahide L - Indian J Dermatol (2009)

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The patients were instructed to avoid direct exposure of the scalp to sun and not to wash the scalp for 48 hours after DPCP treatment... There was no relationship between response to treatment and sex, onset of disease, nail involvement, atopy, extent of hair loss, and family history of alopecia areata... Continuation of the DPCP therapy caused hair re-growth in 21 of them... Adverse effects included contact dermatitis on the face or neck (five of 54), hyperpigmentation (four of 54) and occipital lymphadenopathy (one of 54)... In this study, the response to the treatment in 55.5% of the patients was appropriate... In other reports, however, the percentage of success varied greatly from four to 85%... The changes in response rates may be due to the number of patients in trials, the type, duration and severity of the alopecia areata, and different methods of assessing clinical efficacy... The presence of nail changes, a personal history of atopy, long duration of alopecia before treatment, baseline extent of alopecia, age at disease onset and duration of treatment have been considered as prognostic factors in other studies... It seems that the topical DPCP in the treatment of severe alopecia areata is effective, but with a slightly high relapse rate during treatment... Duration of the disease, less than 10 years, is a main predictor for this response rate.

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(a) 12 months after treatment; (b) 15 months after treatment; (c) 18 months after treatment
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Figure 0001: (a) 12 months after treatment; (b) 15 months after treatment; (c) 18 months after treatment

Mentions: Terminal hair regrowth on the scalp was excellent (76-100%) in 40.7%, good (51-75%) in 14.8%, moderate (26-50%) in 14.8%, and mild (<25%) in 29.6% of patients [Figures 1–3].


The efficacy of topical diphencyprone in the treatment of alopecia areata.

Maryam A, Hassan S, Farshad F, Parastoo B, Vahide L - Indian J Dermatol (2009)

(a) 12 months after treatment; (b) 15 months after treatment; (c) 18 months after treatment
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2800885&req=5

Figure 0001: (a) 12 months after treatment; (b) 15 months after treatment; (c) 18 months after treatment
Mentions: Terminal hair regrowth on the scalp was excellent (76-100%) in 40.7%, good (51-75%) in 14.8%, moderate (26-50%) in 14.8%, and mild (<25%) in 29.6% of patients [Figures 1–3].

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The patients were instructed to avoid direct exposure of the scalp to sun and not to wash the scalp for 48 hours after DPCP treatment... There was no relationship between response to treatment and sex, onset of disease, nail involvement, atopy, extent of hair loss, and family history of alopecia areata... Continuation of the DPCP therapy caused hair re-growth in 21 of them... Adverse effects included contact dermatitis on the face or neck (five of 54), hyperpigmentation (four of 54) and occipital lymphadenopathy (one of 54)... In this study, the response to the treatment in 55.5% of the patients was appropriate... In other reports, however, the percentage of success varied greatly from four to 85%... The changes in response rates may be due to the number of patients in trials, the type, duration and severity of the alopecia areata, and different methods of assessing clinical efficacy... The presence of nail changes, a personal history of atopy, long duration of alopecia before treatment, baseline extent of alopecia, age at disease onset and duration of treatment have been considered as prognostic factors in other studies... It seems that the topical DPCP in the treatment of severe alopecia areata is effective, but with a slightly high relapse rate during treatment... Duration of the disease, less than 10 years, is a main predictor for this response rate.

No MeSH data available.