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Real time in vitro studies of doxorubicin release from PHEMA nanoparticles.

Chouhan R, Bajpai A - J Nanobiotechnology (2009)

Bottom Line: Many anticancer agents have poor water solubility and therefore the development of novel delivery systems for such molecules has received significant attention.PHEMA nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis and surface charge measurements.PHEMA nanoparticles can potentially be used for the controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Bose Memorial Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Government Autonomous Science College, Jabalpur (MP)-482001, India. akbmrl@yahoo.co.in.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many anticancer agents have poor water solubility and therefore the development of novel delivery systems for such molecules has received significant attention. Nanocarriers show great potential in delivering therapeutic agents into the targeted organs or cells and have recently emerged as a promising approach to cancer treatments. The aim of this study was to prepare and use poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (PHEMA) nanoparticles for the controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

Results: PHEMA nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis and surface charge measurements. We also studied the effects of various parameters such as percent loading of drugs, chemical architecture of the nanocarriers, pH, temperature and nature of the release media on the release profiles of the drug. The chemical stability of doxorubicin in PBS was assessed at a range of pH.

Conclusion: Suspension polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) results in the formation of swellable nanoparticles of defined composition. PHEMA nanoparticles can potentially be used for the controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical stability of Doxorubicin. UV spectra showing the chemical stability of doxorubicin in its pure solution (a) and released media (b) at different pH (1.8, 7.4, 8.6).
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Figure 11: Chemical stability of Doxorubicin. UV spectra showing the chemical stability of doxorubicin in its pure solution (a) and released media (b) at different pH (1.8, 7.4, 8.6).

Mentions: The chemical stability of the entrapped drug was investigated by recording the UV-visible absorbance spectra of pure doxorubicin and the drug released into the release medium at different pH (fig. 11). There are no noticeable differences in the obtained absorbance spectra at all pH tested (pH1.8, pH7.4, pH8.6), suggesting no significant changes in the physical properties of the drug, and most likely of its chemical structure during nanoparticle loading and drug release.


Real time in vitro studies of doxorubicin release from PHEMA nanoparticles.

Chouhan R, Bajpai A - J Nanobiotechnology (2009)

Chemical stability of Doxorubicin. UV spectra showing the chemical stability of doxorubicin in its pure solution (a) and released media (b) at different pH (1.8, 7.4, 8.6).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2770983&req=5

Figure 11: Chemical stability of Doxorubicin. UV spectra showing the chemical stability of doxorubicin in its pure solution (a) and released media (b) at different pH (1.8, 7.4, 8.6).
Mentions: The chemical stability of the entrapped drug was investigated by recording the UV-visible absorbance spectra of pure doxorubicin and the drug released into the release medium at different pH (fig. 11). There are no noticeable differences in the obtained absorbance spectra at all pH tested (pH1.8, pH7.4, pH8.6), suggesting no significant changes in the physical properties of the drug, and most likely of its chemical structure during nanoparticle loading and drug release.

Bottom Line: Many anticancer agents have poor water solubility and therefore the development of novel delivery systems for such molecules has received significant attention.PHEMA nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis and surface charge measurements.PHEMA nanoparticles can potentially be used for the controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Bose Memorial Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Government Autonomous Science College, Jabalpur (MP)-482001, India. akbmrl@yahoo.co.in.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many anticancer agents have poor water solubility and therefore the development of novel delivery systems for such molecules has received significant attention. Nanocarriers show great potential in delivering therapeutic agents into the targeted organs or cells and have recently emerged as a promising approach to cancer treatments. The aim of this study was to prepare and use poly-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (PHEMA) nanoparticles for the controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

Results: PHEMA nanoparticles have been synthesized and characterized using FTIR and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), particle size analysis and surface charge measurements. We also studied the effects of various parameters such as percent loading of drugs, chemical architecture of the nanocarriers, pH, temperature and nature of the release media on the release profiles of the drug. The chemical stability of doxorubicin in PBS was assessed at a range of pH.

Conclusion: Suspension polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) results in the formation of swellable nanoparticles of defined composition. PHEMA nanoparticles can potentially be used for the controlled release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus