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Multidisciplinary functional MR imaging for prostate cancer.

Kim JK, Jang YJ, Cho G - Korean J Radiol (2009 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy.These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies.Therefore, in order to make accurate diagnoses, it is important to comprehensively understand their advantages and limitations, histologic background related with image findings, and their clinical relevance for evaluating prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736, Korea. rialto@amc.seoul.kr

ABSTRACT
Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies. However, each functional MR imaging technique also has inherent challenges. Therefore, in order to make accurate diagnoses, it is important to comprehensively understand their advantages and limitations, histologic background related with image findings, and their clinical relevance for evaluating prostate cancer. This article will review the basic principles and clinical significance of functional MR imaging for evaluating prostate cancer.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Transitional zone versus prostate cancer.A. Gross pathological image of radical prostatectomy specimen located where area of prostate cancer is outlined.B. Ktrans map shows increased perfusion in transitional and peripheral zones of right lobe. Multiple foci of high permeability areas in transitional zone are related with benign prostatic hyperplasia rather than prostate cancer.
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Figure 12: Transitional zone versus prostate cancer.A. Gross pathological image of radical prostatectomy specimen located where area of prostate cancer is outlined.B. Ktrans map shows increased perfusion in transitional and peripheral zones of right lobe. Multiple foci of high permeability areas in transitional zone are related with benign prostatic hyperplasia rather than prostate cancer.

Mentions: Challenges - Despite promising results by previous investigators with regard to using various perfusion parameters from DCE MRI for cancer detection and localization, it should be noted that those parameters also showed considerable overlap between prostate cancer and non-cancerous tissue (30, 36, 47). This limitation is prominent for differentiating prostate cancer from non-cancerous transitional zone tissue. This overlap also decreases specificity for cancer detection, as noted in previous studies (specificity of 51%) (30) (Fig. 12). This limitation is caused by increased BPH angiogenesis, which was indicated by a significant overlap of the microvessel density between BPH and prostate cancer (48).


Multidisciplinary functional MR imaging for prostate cancer.

Kim JK, Jang YJ, Cho G - Korean J Radiol (2009 Nov-Dec)

Transitional zone versus prostate cancer.A. Gross pathological image of radical prostatectomy specimen located where area of prostate cancer is outlined.B. Ktrans map shows increased perfusion in transitional and peripheral zones of right lobe. Multiple foci of high permeability areas in transitional zone are related with benign prostatic hyperplasia rather than prostate cancer.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2770824&req=5

Figure 12: Transitional zone versus prostate cancer.A. Gross pathological image of radical prostatectomy specimen located where area of prostate cancer is outlined.B. Ktrans map shows increased perfusion in transitional and peripheral zones of right lobe. Multiple foci of high permeability areas in transitional zone are related with benign prostatic hyperplasia rather than prostate cancer.
Mentions: Challenges - Despite promising results by previous investigators with regard to using various perfusion parameters from DCE MRI for cancer detection and localization, it should be noted that those parameters also showed considerable overlap between prostate cancer and non-cancerous tissue (30, 36, 47). This limitation is prominent for differentiating prostate cancer from non-cancerous transitional zone tissue. This overlap also decreases specificity for cancer detection, as noted in previous studies (specificity of 51%) (30) (Fig. 12). This limitation is caused by increased BPH angiogenesis, which was indicated by a significant overlap of the microvessel density between BPH and prostate cancer (48).

Bottom Line: Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy.These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies.Therefore, in order to make accurate diagnoses, it is important to comprehensively understand their advantages and limitations, histologic background related with image findings, and their clinical relevance for evaluating prostate cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736, Korea. rialto@amc.seoul.kr

ABSTRACT
Various functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques are used for evaluating prostate cancer including diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and MR spectroscopy. These techniques provide unique information that is helpful to differentiate prostate cancer from non-cancerous tissue and have been proven to improve the diagnostic performance of MRI not only for cancer detection, but also for staging, post-treatment monitoring, and guiding prostate biopsies. However, each functional MR imaging technique also has inherent challenges. Therefore, in order to make accurate diagnoses, it is important to comprehensively understand their advantages and limitations, histologic background related with image findings, and their clinical relevance for evaluating prostate cancer. This article will review the basic principles and clinical significance of functional MR imaging for evaluating prostate cancer.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus