Limits...
Burn injury and explosions: an Australian perspective.

Greenwood JE - Eplasty (2009)

Bottom Line: This has been expanded upon with discussion points which provide a strategy for planning for such events and by a broad sample of the literature.Disasters generating large numbers of burn-injured are relatively frequent.Explosive devices are widespread in their use both in military and increasingly in civilian fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia. john.greenwood@health.sa.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Increasingly (but not exclusively), terrorist activity and the use of explosive devices have enjoyed the focus of the global media. This paper aims to bring a range of issues to attention, to highlight how burn injuries are sustained in such incidents and why burn injuries (and thus burn disasters) are so complicated to manage.

Materials and methods: The author's experience with burn injury caused during explosions and his involvement in burn disaster situations has been summarized to form the basis of the article. This has been expanded upon with discussion points which provide a strategy for planning for such events and by a broad sample of the literature.

Results: Several strategies are suggested to facilitate planning for burn disasters and to illustrate to those not directly involved why forward planning is pivotal to success when these incidents occur.

Conclusions: Disasters generating large numbers of burn-injured are relatively frequent. Explosive devices are widespread in their use both in military and increasingly in civilian fields. Encompassing a large range of aetiologies, geographical sites, populations, and resources; burn disaster management is difficult and planning essential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Superficial partial-thickness facial burns from the same petrol explosion displaying the unburned “crow's feet” around the eyes. This gives an indication of the speed and effectiveness of the “blink” reflex in protecting the eyes in these situations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2752474&req=5

Figure 5: Superficial partial-thickness facial burns from the same petrol explosion displaying the unburned “crow's feet” around the eyes. This gives an indication of the speed and effectiveness of the “blink” reflex in protecting the eyes in these situations.

Mentions: Although exposed areas (Figs 4 and 5) sustain superficial burns, full-thickness burns resulted on these hands as a result of the ignition of clothing. The fireball from the explosion set fire to his gloves.


Burn injury and explosions: an Australian perspective.

Greenwood JE - Eplasty (2009)

Superficial partial-thickness facial burns from the same petrol explosion displaying the unburned “crow's feet” around the eyes. This gives an indication of the speed and effectiveness of the “blink” reflex in protecting the eyes in these situations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2752474&req=5

Figure 5: Superficial partial-thickness facial burns from the same petrol explosion displaying the unburned “crow's feet” around the eyes. This gives an indication of the speed and effectiveness of the “blink” reflex in protecting the eyes in these situations.
Mentions: Although exposed areas (Figs 4 and 5) sustain superficial burns, full-thickness burns resulted on these hands as a result of the ignition of clothing. The fireball from the explosion set fire to his gloves.

Bottom Line: This has been expanded upon with discussion points which provide a strategy for planning for such events and by a broad sample of the literature.Disasters generating large numbers of burn-injured are relatively frequent.Explosive devices are widespread in their use both in military and increasingly in civilian fields.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide 5000, South Australia. john.greenwood@health.sa.gov.au

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Increasingly (but not exclusively), terrorist activity and the use of explosive devices have enjoyed the focus of the global media. This paper aims to bring a range of issues to attention, to highlight how burn injuries are sustained in such incidents and why burn injuries (and thus burn disasters) are so complicated to manage.

Materials and methods: The author's experience with burn injury caused during explosions and his involvement in burn disaster situations has been summarized to form the basis of the article. This has been expanded upon with discussion points which provide a strategy for planning for such events and by a broad sample of the literature.

Results: Several strategies are suggested to facilitate planning for burn disasters and to illustrate to those not directly involved why forward planning is pivotal to success when these incidents occur.

Conclusions: Disasters generating large numbers of burn-injured are relatively frequent. Explosive devices are widespread in their use both in military and increasingly in civilian fields. Encompassing a large range of aetiologies, geographical sites, populations, and resources; burn disaster management is difficult and planning essential.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus