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Left-sided gall bladder: Report of two cases.

Chrungoo RK, Kachroo SL, Sharma AK, Khan AB, Nadim AS - J Minim Access Surg (2007)

Bottom Line: Left-sided gall bladder without situs inversus viscerum is a rare albeit recognized clinical entity.Left-sided gall bladder may provide an unusual surprise to the surgeons during laparoscopy as routine pre-operative studies may not always detect the anomaly.Awareness of the unpredictable confluence of the cystic duct into the common bile duct (CBD) and selective use of intraoperative cholangiography aid in the safe laparoscopic management of this unusual entity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Govt. Medical College, Bakshi Nagar, Jammu - 180 001, (J and K), India.

ABSTRACT
Left-sided gall bladder without situs inversus viscerum is a rare albeit recognized clinical entity. We report our experience of two cases of left-sided gall bladder in two women aged 36 and 48 who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for chronic calculous cholecystitis. Left-sided gall bladder may provide an unusual surprise to the surgeons during laparoscopy as routine pre-operative studies may not always detect the anomaly. Awareness of the unpredictable confluence of the cystic duct into the common bile duct (CBD) and selective use of intraoperative cholangiography aid in the safe laparoscopic management of this unusual entity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gall bladder on left side of the falciparum ligament
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Figure 0002: Gall bladder on left side of the falciparum ligament

Mentions: A 48-year-old female was admitted in the hospital with complaint of pain in the right upper abdomen for three to four months with nausea and vomiting. There was no history of fever, jaundice and hospitalization. Liver function tests were normal. Ultrasonography showed cholelithiasis with gall bladder wall thickening. A laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed using standard 4-port technique. The gall bladder was lying to the left of the falciform ligament [Figure 2]. The cardiac pulsation was on the left side and rest of the abdominal viscera were normally positioned. Cystic artery was found to be crossing in front of the CBD. Cystic duct opened into the common hepatic duct on its right side. The cystic artery and cystic duct were clipped and divided and retrograde dissection of gall bladder done [Figure 3]. The gall bladder was extracted through the epigastric port. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the first postoperative day. Histopathological examination revealed features suggestive of chronic cholecystitis.


Left-sided gall bladder: Report of two cases.

Chrungoo RK, Kachroo SL, Sharma AK, Khan AB, Nadim AS - J Minim Access Surg (2007)

Gall bladder on left side of the falciparum ligament
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2749185&req=5

Figure 0002: Gall bladder on left side of the falciparum ligament
Mentions: A 48-year-old female was admitted in the hospital with complaint of pain in the right upper abdomen for three to four months with nausea and vomiting. There was no history of fever, jaundice and hospitalization. Liver function tests were normal. Ultrasonography showed cholelithiasis with gall bladder wall thickening. A laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed using standard 4-port technique. The gall bladder was lying to the left of the falciform ligament [Figure 2]. The cardiac pulsation was on the left side and rest of the abdominal viscera were normally positioned. Cystic artery was found to be crossing in front of the CBD. Cystic duct opened into the common hepatic duct on its right side. The cystic artery and cystic duct were clipped and divided and retrograde dissection of gall bladder done [Figure 3]. The gall bladder was extracted through the epigastric port. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the first postoperative day. Histopathological examination revealed features suggestive of chronic cholecystitis.

Bottom Line: Left-sided gall bladder without situs inversus viscerum is a rare albeit recognized clinical entity.Left-sided gall bladder may provide an unusual surprise to the surgeons during laparoscopy as routine pre-operative studies may not always detect the anomaly.Awareness of the unpredictable confluence of the cystic duct into the common bile duct (CBD) and selective use of intraoperative cholangiography aid in the safe laparoscopic management of this unusual entity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Govt. Medical College, Bakshi Nagar, Jammu - 180 001, (J and K), India.

ABSTRACT
Left-sided gall bladder without situs inversus viscerum is a rare albeit recognized clinical entity. We report our experience of two cases of left-sided gall bladder in two women aged 36 and 48 who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for chronic calculous cholecystitis. Left-sided gall bladder may provide an unusual surprise to the surgeons during laparoscopy as routine pre-operative studies may not always detect the anomaly. Awareness of the unpredictable confluence of the cystic duct into the common bile duct (CBD) and selective use of intraoperative cholangiography aid in the safe laparoscopic management of this unusual entity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus