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Clinical profile of eprosartan: a different angiotensin II receptor blocker.

Blankestijn PJ, Rupp H - Cardiovasc Hematol Agents Med Chem (2008)

Bottom Line: Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important.An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system.Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. p.j.blankestijn@umcutrecht.nl

ABSTRACT
Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic representation of the renin-angiotensin system and the sites of action of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.
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Figure 1: Schematic representation of the renin-angiotensin system and the sites of action of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.

Mentions: There is conclusive evidence that the RAS and SNS systems do not operate independently, but that there are multiple interactions on different levels of the cardiovascular system. It is well established that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) reduce the effects of angiotensin II Fig. (1). These therapies also appear to have sympatholytic properties, which may be particularly important in determining the efficacy of these agents in reducing cardiovascular risk, since there is abundant evidence that sympathetic hyperactivity is associated with poor clinical outcome.


Clinical profile of eprosartan: a different angiotensin II receptor blocker.

Blankestijn PJ, Rupp H - Cardiovasc Hematol Agents Med Chem (2008)

Schematic representation of the renin-angiotensin system and the sites of action of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2748700&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic representation of the renin-angiotensin system and the sites of action of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers.
Mentions: There is conclusive evidence that the RAS and SNS systems do not operate independently, but that there are multiple interactions on different levels of the cardiovascular system. It is well established that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) reduce the effects of angiotensin II Fig. (1). These therapies also appear to have sympatholytic properties, which may be particularly important in determining the efficacy of these agents in reducing cardiovascular risk, since there is abundant evidence that sympathetic hyperactivity is associated with poor clinical outcome.

Bottom Line: Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important.An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system.Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. p.j.blankestijn@umcutrecht.nl

ABSTRACT
Rationale. The goal of antihypertensive treatment is to reduce risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Apart from blood pressure lowering per se, also reducing the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system appears to be important. Angiotensin II receptor blocker drugs (ARBs) have provided a useful class of anti-hypertensive drugs. Eprosartan is a relatively new ARB which is chemically distinct (non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole) from all other ARBs (biphenyl tetrazoles). An analysis has been made on available experimental and clinical data on eprosartan which not only is an effective and well tolerated antihypertensive agent, but also lowers the activities of the renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic nervous system. Experimental and pharmacokinetic studies on eprosartan have shown differences with the other ARBs. The distinct properties of this non-biphenyl, non-tetrazole ARB might be relevant in the effort to reduce cardiovascular risk, also beyond its blood pressure lowering capacity.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus