Limits...
Narrow band imaging (NBI) during medical thoracoscopy: first impressions.

Schönfeld N, Schwarz C, Kollmeier J, Blum T, Bauer TT, Ott S - J Occup Med Toxicol (2009)

Bottom Line: In the great majority of the patients narrow band imaging depicted the blood vessels more clearly than white light, but failed to reveal any differences in number, shape or size.Only in a single case with pleura thickened by chronic inflammation and metastatic spread of lung cancer did narrow band imaging show vessels that were not detectable under white light.It is not yet possible to assess to what extent the evidence provided by NBI is superior to that achieved with white light.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, HELIOS Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany. schoenfeld.berlin@t-online.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: This is the first ever evaluation of narrow band imaging (NBI), an innovative endoscopic imaging procedure, for the visualisation of pleural processes.

Methods: The pleural cavity was examined in 26 patients with pleural effusions using both white light and narrow band imaging during thoracoscopy under local anaesthesia.

Results: In the great majority of the patients narrow band imaging depicted the blood vessels more clearly than white light, but failed to reveal any differences in number, shape or size. Only in a single case with pleura thickened by chronic inflammation and metastatic spread of lung cancer did narrow band imaging show vessels that were not detectable under white light.

Conclusion: It is not yet possible to assess to what extent the evidence provided by NBI is superior to that achieved with white light. Further studies are required, particularly in the early stages of pleural processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pleural cavity of patient #26, NBI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2748073&req=5

Figure 2: Pleural cavity of patient #26, NBI.

Mentions: The results are summarised in Table 1. A total of 15 women (median age 66 years) and 11 men (median age 64 years) with pleural effusions were examined. Biopsies of the parietal pleura or diaphragm were taken for all but one of these patients. Only in patient #26 NBI showed more vessels than white light (fig. 1 and 2). In all other patients, there was either no difference, or blood vessels merely appeared more prominent (example in fig. 3 and 4).


Narrow band imaging (NBI) during medical thoracoscopy: first impressions.

Schönfeld N, Schwarz C, Kollmeier J, Blum T, Bauer TT, Ott S - J Occup Med Toxicol (2009)

Pleural cavity of patient #26, NBI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2748073&req=5

Figure 2: Pleural cavity of patient #26, NBI.
Mentions: The results are summarised in Table 1. A total of 15 women (median age 66 years) and 11 men (median age 64 years) with pleural effusions were examined. Biopsies of the parietal pleura or diaphragm were taken for all but one of these patients. Only in patient #26 NBI showed more vessels than white light (fig. 1 and 2). In all other patients, there was either no difference, or blood vessels merely appeared more prominent (example in fig. 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: In the great majority of the patients narrow band imaging depicted the blood vessels more clearly than white light, but failed to reveal any differences in number, shape or size.Only in a single case with pleura thickened by chronic inflammation and metastatic spread of lung cancer did narrow band imaging show vessels that were not detectable under white light.It is not yet possible to assess to what extent the evidence provided by NBI is superior to that achieved with white light.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Lungenklinik Heckeshorn, HELIOS Klinikum Emil von Behring, Berlin, Germany. schoenfeld.berlin@t-online.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: This is the first ever evaluation of narrow band imaging (NBI), an innovative endoscopic imaging procedure, for the visualisation of pleural processes.

Methods: The pleural cavity was examined in 26 patients with pleural effusions using both white light and narrow band imaging during thoracoscopy under local anaesthesia.

Results: In the great majority of the patients narrow band imaging depicted the blood vessels more clearly than white light, but failed to reveal any differences in number, shape or size. Only in a single case with pleura thickened by chronic inflammation and metastatic spread of lung cancer did narrow band imaging show vessels that were not detectable under white light.

Conclusion: It is not yet possible to assess to what extent the evidence provided by NBI is superior to that achieved with white light. Further studies are required, particularly in the early stages of pleural processes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus