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Role of cervical ultrasonography in primary hyperparathyroidism.

Shaheen F, Chowdry N, Gojwari T, Wani AI, Khan S - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2008)

Bottom Line: The results were independently analyzed and compared with per-operative findings.As limited neck dissection for primary hyperparathyroidism becomes increasingly popular, USG has been found to be a sensitive, specific, and easily available noninvasive investigation for parathyroid localization.It can be easily offered to patients as a method for preoperative localization prior to limited parathyroid surgery outside tertiary care settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the role of USG in the preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas in patients with symptomatic hyperparathyroidism and to compare its usefulness with that of scintigraphy scan and postoperative findings.

Material and methods: Twenty-five patients with symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism were subjected to USG of the neck and nuclear scintigraphy, followed by surgery. The results were independently analyzed and compared with per-operative findings.

Results: The 25 patients had a total of 28 abnormal glands: 22 solitary adenomas, and 6 multiple adenomas (two each in three patients). USG detected 20 out of 22 solitary adenomas and three out of six multiple adenomas. USG missed five abnormal glands, two of which were in the neck and three in the mediastinum. Scintigraphy was positive in 26 abnormal glands, out of which 22 were single and four were multiple. Two abnormal glands were missed: one in the neck and one in the mediastinum.

Conclusion: As limited neck dissection for primary hyperparathyroidism becomes increasingly popular, USG has been found to be a sensitive, specific, and easily available noninvasive investigation for parathyroid localization. It can be easily offered to patients as a method for preoperative localization prior to limited parathyroid surgery outside tertiary care settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Longitudinal USG shows a large parathyroid adenoma inferior to the left thyroid lobe
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Figure 0002: Longitudinal USG shows a large parathyroid adenoma inferior to the left thyroid lobe

Mentions: USG was performed with a high-resolution linear transducer of 12 MHz frequency (ATL-HDI 1500, Philips). The examiner was blinded to the results of any previous imaging. USG was performed with the neck extended in the supine position, with the thyroid gland as the reference; scanning was done cephalad and caudad from the reference point up to the submandibular gland and the sternal notch, respectively. Parathyroid adenoma was recognized as a well-defined mass with a homogenous echo pattern, hypoechoic to thyroid tissue and with a fatty cleavage plane separating it from the adjacent thyroid lobe [Figure 1]. The gland position was defined as superior or inferior to the thyroid gland [Figure 2].


Role of cervical ultrasonography in primary hyperparathyroidism.

Shaheen F, Chowdry N, Gojwari T, Wani AI, Khan S - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2008)

Longitudinal USG shows a large parathyroid adenoma inferior to the left thyroid lobe
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747464&req=5

Figure 0002: Longitudinal USG shows a large parathyroid adenoma inferior to the left thyroid lobe
Mentions: USG was performed with a high-resolution linear transducer of 12 MHz frequency (ATL-HDI 1500, Philips). The examiner was blinded to the results of any previous imaging. USG was performed with the neck extended in the supine position, with the thyroid gland as the reference; scanning was done cephalad and caudad from the reference point up to the submandibular gland and the sternal notch, respectively. Parathyroid adenoma was recognized as a well-defined mass with a homogenous echo pattern, hypoechoic to thyroid tissue and with a fatty cleavage plane separating it from the adjacent thyroid lobe [Figure 1]. The gland position was defined as superior or inferior to the thyroid gland [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: The results were independently analyzed and compared with per-operative findings.As limited neck dissection for primary hyperparathyroidism becomes increasingly popular, USG has been found to be a sensitive, specific, and easily available noninvasive investigation for parathyroid localization.It can be easily offered to patients as a method for preoperative localization prior to limited parathyroid surgery outside tertiary care settings.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the role of USG in the preoperative localization of parathyroid adenomas in patients with symptomatic hyperparathyroidism and to compare its usefulness with that of scintigraphy scan and postoperative findings.

Material and methods: Twenty-five patients with symptomatic primary hyperparathyroidism were subjected to USG of the neck and nuclear scintigraphy, followed by surgery. The results were independently analyzed and compared with per-operative findings.

Results: The 25 patients had a total of 28 abnormal glands: 22 solitary adenomas, and 6 multiple adenomas (two each in three patients). USG detected 20 out of 22 solitary adenomas and three out of six multiple adenomas. USG missed five abnormal glands, two of which were in the neck and three in the mediastinum. Scintigraphy was positive in 26 abnormal glands, out of which 22 were single and four were multiple. Two abnormal glands were missed: one in the neck and one in the mediastinum.

Conclusion: As limited neck dissection for primary hyperparathyroidism becomes increasingly popular, USG has been found to be a sensitive, specific, and easily available noninvasive investigation for parathyroid localization. It can be easily offered to patients as a method for preoperative localization prior to limited parathyroid surgery outside tertiary care settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus