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Case report: Epidermoid cyst misdiagnosed as a loculated pericardial effusion.

Sharma N, Sharma A, Bajaj M - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2008)

Bottom Line: A 25-year old man presented with a mediastinal lesion which was initially diagnosed as a loculated pericardial collection on echocardiography.Subsequent imaging showed it to be a cystic mediastinal mass, and following surgery and histopathology, it turned out to be an epidermoid cyst.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis, R.N.T. Medical College and Associated Group of Hospitals, Udaipur (Rajasthan)-313 004, India.

ABSTRACT
A 25-year old man presented with a mediastinal lesion which was initially diagnosed as a loculated pericardial collection on echocardiography. Subsequent imaging showed it to be a cystic mediastinal mass, and following surgery and histopathology, it turned out to be an epidermoid cyst.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Axial, plain (A), post-contrast (B), and coronal post-contrast (C) images show a hypodense, non-enhancing lesion (arrows) displacing and compressing the heart as well as the superior vena cava (arrowhead)
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Figure 0002: Axial, plain (A), post-contrast (B), and coronal post-contrast (C) images show a hypodense, non-enhancing lesion (arrows) displacing and compressing the heart as well as the superior vena cava (arrowhead)

Mentions: Echocardiography was performed and a diagnosis of a loculated pericardial effusion on the right side of the heart was made; the heart had been displaced to the left and there was compression of the right atrium and ventricle. Pericardiocentesis yielded thick turbid fluid. CT scan of the chest showed a fluid-density cystic lesion with no enhancement; it was situated in the anterosuperior mediastinum and measured 183 × 132 × 154 mm in size. The lesion had displaced the heart to the left, with compression of the right atrium and ventricle; there was also encasement and compression of the major vessels, including the superior vena cava and its tributaries [Figure 2]. No associated vertebral anomaly was detected. The patient was taken up for immediate surgery, which revealed a large, tense, cystic mass in the anterosuperior mediastinum, attached to the pericardium. It was resected intact. There was no evidence of any intraspinal extension or fibrous connection with the thoracic spine. The cyst showed homogeneous contents and had a smooth wall. Histopathology revealed a fibrous wall lined by stratified squamous epithelium with laminated overlying keratin, consistent with a diagnosis of epidermoid cyst [Figure 3]. The patient unfortunately succumbed to postoperative respiratory complications


Case report: Epidermoid cyst misdiagnosed as a loculated pericardial effusion.

Sharma N, Sharma A, Bajaj M - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2008)

Axial, plain (A), post-contrast (B), and coronal post-contrast (C) images show a hypodense, non-enhancing lesion (arrows) displacing and compressing the heart as well as the superior vena cava (arrowhead)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747452&req=5

Figure 0002: Axial, plain (A), post-contrast (B), and coronal post-contrast (C) images show a hypodense, non-enhancing lesion (arrows) displacing and compressing the heart as well as the superior vena cava (arrowhead)
Mentions: Echocardiography was performed and a diagnosis of a loculated pericardial effusion on the right side of the heart was made; the heart had been displaced to the left and there was compression of the right atrium and ventricle. Pericardiocentesis yielded thick turbid fluid. CT scan of the chest showed a fluid-density cystic lesion with no enhancement; it was situated in the anterosuperior mediastinum and measured 183 × 132 × 154 mm in size. The lesion had displaced the heart to the left, with compression of the right atrium and ventricle; there was also encasement and compression of the major vessels, including the superior vena cava and its tributaries [Figure 2]. No associated vertebral anomaly was detected. The patient was taken up for immediate surgery, which revealed a large, tense, cystic mass in the anterosuperior mediastinum, attached to the pericardium. It was resected intact. There was no evidence of any intraspinal extension or fibrous connection with the thoracic spine. The cyst showed homogeneous contents and had a smooth wall. Histopathology revealed a fibrous wall lined by stratified squamous epithelium with laminated overlying keratin, consistent with a diagnosis of epidermoid cyst [Figure 3]. The patient unfortunately succumbed to postoperative respiratory complications

Bottom Line: A 25-year old man presented with a mediastinal lesion which was initially diagnosed as a loculated pericardial collection on echocardiography.Subsequent imaging showed it to be a cystic mediastinal mass, and following surgery and histopathology, it turned out to be an epidermoid cyst.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiodiagnosis, R.N.T. Medical College and Associated Group of Hospitals, Udaipur (Rajasthan)-313 004, India.

ABSTRACT
A 25-year old man presented with a mediastinal lesion which was initially diagnosed as a loculated pericardial collection on echocardiography. Subsequent imaging showed it to be a cystic mediastinal mass, and following surgery and histopathology, it turned out to be an epidermoid cyst.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus