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Anterior abdominal wall cysticercosis-the role of high-resolution USG.

Mittal A, Gupta S, Mehta V, Gupta R - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2008)

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We want to draw attention to another very important pathology of the anterior abdominal wall that is endemic in our country, which is subcutaneous or intramuscular cysticercosis... The first patient, a 28-year-old man, presented with a swelling on the left side of the anterior abdominal wall that had been present for 1 month... Clinically, it was diagnosed as a lipoma or neurofibroma... The patient was sent for a high-resolution USG study, which revealed a well-defined cystic lesion with an echogenic nidus in the subcutaneous tissue in the area of the swelling [Figure 1]... The second patient was a 35-year-old man presenting with a painful swelling on the right side of the anterior abdominal wall for 8-10 days... There was no history of fever or trauma... Clinically, it was diagnosed as an abscess... In both these cases no further investigations were done... The patients recovered fully after treatment with albendazole and corticosteroids... High-resolution USG plays an important role in establishing the diagnosis of muscular and subcutaneous cysticercosis... The salient diagnostic feature of a cysticercus granuloma is the presence of an oval or rounded well-defined cystic lesion, with an eccentric echogenic nidus within... If this picture is seen in a subcutaneous or intramuscular swelling, the diagnosis of cysticercosis can be made with great confidence and no further investigations are required; biopsy or the less reliable fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) can be avoided... These patients can be managed conservatively and the diagnosis can be confirmed by the therapeutic response.

No MeSH data available.


USG shows a cystic lesion (arrow) with a hypoechoic area (arrowhead) in the left rectus abdominis muscle
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Figure 0002: USG shows a cystic lesion (arrow) with a hypoechoic area (arrowhead) in the left rectus abdominis muscle

Mentions: The second patient was a 35-year-old man presenting with a painful swelling on the right side of the anterior abdominal wall for 8-10 days. On examination, the swelling was tender and hard and the skin overlying the swelling was inflamed. There was no history of fever or trauma. Clinically, it was diagnosed as an abscess. On high-resolution USG, there was a small cyst of size 3 mm, with a surrounding 15 × 22-mm hypoechoic area in the left rectus abdominis muscle [Figure 2]. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of intramuscular cysticercosis with surrounding inflammatory phlegmon in the rectus abdominis muscle was made.


Anterior abdominal wall cysticercosis-the role of high-resolution USG.

Mittal A, Gupta S, Mehta V, Gupta R - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2008)

USG shows a cystic lesion (arrow) with a hypoechoic area (arrowhead) in the left rectus abdominis muscle
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747430&req=5

Figure 0002: USG shows a cystic lesion (arrow) with a hypoechoic area (arrowhead) in the left rectus abdominis muscle
Mentions: The second patient was a 35-year-old man presenting with a painful swelling on the right side of the anterior abdominal wall for 8-10 days. On examination, the swelling was tender and hard and the skin overlying the swelling was inflamed. There was no history of fever or trauma. Clinically, it was diagnosed as an abscess. On high-resolution USG, there was a small cyst of size 3 mm, with a surrounding 15 × 22-mm hypoechoic area in the left rectus abdominis muscle [Figure 2]. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of intramuscular cysticercosis with surrounding inflammatory phlegmon in the rectus abdominis muscle was made.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

We want to draw attention to another very important pathology of the anterior abdominal wall that is endemic in our country, which is subcutaneous or intramuscular cysticercosis... The first patient, a 28-year-old man, presented with a swelling on the left side of the anterior abdominal wall that had been present for 1 month... Clinically, it was diagnosed as a lipoma or neurofibroma... The patient was sent for a high-resolution USG study, which revealed a well-defined cystic lesion with an echogenic nidus in the subcutaneous tissue in the area of the swelling [Figure 1]... The second patient was a 35-year-old man presenting with a painful swelling on the right side of the anterior abdominal wall for 8-10 days... There was no history of fever or trauma... Clinically, it was diagnosed as an abscess... In both these cases no further investigations were done... The patients recovered fully after treatment with albendazole and corticosteroids... High-resolution USG plays an important role in establishing the diagnosis of muscular and subcutaneous cysticercosis... The salient diagnostic feature of a cysticercus granuloma is the presence of an oval or rounded well-defined cystic lesion, with an eccentric echogenic nidus within... If this picture is seen in a subcutaneous or intramuscular swelling, the diagnosis of cysticercosis can be made with great confidence and no further investigations are required; biopsy or the less reliable fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) can be avoided... These patients can be managed conservatively and the diagnosis can be confirmed by the therapeutic response.

No MeSH data available.