Limits...
Fetal diastematomyelia: MR imaging: A case report.

Kulkarni M, Ruparel M, Redkar R - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: MRI is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies suspected on USG.The USG evaluation of fetal spinal anomalies is limited by acoustic shadowing, fetal position and the amount of liquor.Fetal MRI is able to show spinal anomalies well, as in our case of fetal diastematomyelia with a dorsal dermal sinus, suspected on USG at 28 weeks gestation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lilavati Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
MRI is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies suspected on USG. The USG evaluation of fetal spinal anomalies is limited by acoustic shadowing, fetal position and the amount of liquor. Fetal MRI is able to show spinal anomalies well, as in our case of fetal diastematomyelia with a dorsal dermal sinus, suspected on USG at 28 weeks gestation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gross examination of the neonate (A) shows swelling and a tuft of hair (white arrow) in the midline. T1W coronal MRI image (B) of the neonatal spine shows splitting of the spinal cord in the cervicodorsal (white arrow) and lower dorsal (black arrow) regions, with a thick band between the two hemicords (arrowhead). Sagittal T2W HASTE image (C) shows a track (white arrow) extending from the skin surface to the spinal canal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747417&req=5

Figure 0002: Gross examination of the neonate (A) shows swelling and a tuft of hair (white arrow) in the midline. T1W coronal MRI image (B) of the neonatal spine shows splitting of the spinal cord in the cervicodorsal (white arrow) and lower dorsal (black arrow) regions, with a thick band between the two hemicords (arrowhead). Sagittal T2W HASTE image (C) shows a track (white arrow) extending from the skin surface to the spinal canal.

Mentions: At birth, examination of the newborn showed a small midline swelling in the upper dorsal region, with a tuft of hair on the skin surface [Figure 2A]. The swelling was soft. There was no discharge. MRI was done on day 2 of the neonatal period. There was diastematomyelia from the C6 to the D2 levels [Figure 2B], with a thick band separating the two hemicords. This band was seen extending up to the pedicle. There was a sinus track extending from the skin surface up to the spinal canal. [Figure 2C]. There was no intraspinal lipoma. The cord was reunited below the D2 level and then was split again from the D8 to the D11 levels [Figure 2B]; there was no septum between the two hemicords at this level. The two hemicords were asymmetrical. There was no cord tethering. The conus ended at the L4 level.


Fetal diastematomyelia: MR imaging: A case report.

Kulkarni M, Ruparel M, Redkar R - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Gross examination of the neonate (A) shows swelling and a tuft of hair (white arrow) in the midline. T1W coronal MRI image (B) of the neonatal spine shows splitting of the spinal cord in the cervicodorsal (white arrow) and lower dorsal (black arrow) regions, with a thick band between the two hemicords (arrowhead). Sagittal T2W HASTE image (C) shows a track (white arrow) extending from the skin surface to the spinal canal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747417&req=5

Figure 0002: Gross examination of the neonate (A) shows swelling and a tuft of hair (white arrow) in the midline. T1W coronal MRI image (B) of the neonatal spine shows splitting of the spinal cord in the cervicodorsal (white arrow) and lower dorsal (black arrow) regions, with a thick band between the two hemicords (arrowhead). Sagittal T2W HASTE image (C) shows a track (white arrow) extending from the skin surface to the spinal canal.
Mentions: At birth, examination of the newborn showed a small midline swelling in the upper dorsal region, with a tuft of hair on the skin surface [Figure 2A]. The swelling was soft. There was no discharge. MRI was done on day 2 of the neonatal period. There was diastematomyelia from the C6 to the D2 levels [Figure 2B], with a thick band separating the two hemicords. This band was seen extending up to the pedicle. There was a sinus track extending from the skin surface up to the spinal canal. [Figure 2C]. There was no intraspinal lipoma. The cord was reunited below the D2 level and then was split again from the D8 to the D11 levels [Figure 2B]; there was no septum between the two hemicords at this level. The two hemicords were asymmetrical. There was no cord tethering. The conus ended at the L4 level.

Bottom Line: MRI is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies suspected on USG.The USG evaluation of fetal spinal anomalies is limited by acoustic shadowing, fetal position and the amount of liquor.Fetal MRI is able to show spinal anomalies well, as in our case of fetal diastematomyelia with a dorsal dermal sinus, suspected on USG at 28 weeks gestation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Lilavati Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, India.

ABSTRACT
MRI is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of fetal anomalies suspected on USG. The USG evaluation of fetal spinal anomalies is limited by acoustic shadowing, fetal position and the amount of liquor. Fetal MRI is able to show spinal anomalies well, as in our case of fetal diastematomyelia with a dorsal dermal sinus, suspected on USG at 28 weeks gestation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus