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Monitor displays in radiology: Part 1.

Indrajit I, Verma B - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: Monitor displays are an integral part of today's radiology work environment, attached to workstations, USG, CT/MRI consoles and PACS terminals.For each modality and method of use, the correct display monitor needs to be deployed.It helps to have a basic understanding of how monitors work and what are the issues involved in their selection.

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ABSTRACT
Monitor displays are an integral part of today's radiology work environment, attached to workstations, USG, CT/MRI consoles and PACS terminals. For each modality and method of use, the correct display monitor needs to be deployed. It helps to have a basic understanding of how monitors work and what are the issues involved in their selection.

No MeSH data available.


Profile view comparing CRT and LCD monitor displays. LCD monitor displays have the advantages of having smaller footprints and being perfectly flat, less heavy, thinner, and more adjustable
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Figure 0001: Profile view comparing CRT and LCD monitor displays. LCD monitor displays have the advantages of having smaller footprints and being perfectly flat, less heavy, thinner, and more adjustable

Mentions: Over the years, two different monitor display technologies have emerged in the computer industry, i.e., the cathode ray tube (CRT) and the liquid crystal display (LCD). CRT is a mature technology, while the LCD is a recent innovation [Table 1]. LCD monitor displays have the advantages of having a smaller footprint and of being perfectly flat, less heavy, thinner, and more adjustable [Figure 1]. One significant difference between the two is in the integration of the key steps of light generation and modulation. In LCD monitors, light generation and light modulation are physically separated, unlike in CRT monitors [Figure 2].[7] Currently, LCD monitors are preferred over CRT displays.[4]


Monitor displays in radiology: Part 1.

Indrajit I, Verma B - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Profile view comparing CRT and LCD monitor displays. LCD monitor displays have the advantages of having smaller footprints and being perfectly flat, less heavy, thinner, and more adjustable
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747408&req=5

Figure 0001: Profile view comparing CRT and LCD monitor displays. LCD monitor displays have the advantages of having smaller footprints and being perfectly flat, less heavy, thinner, and more adjustable
Mentions: Over the years, two different monitor display technologies have emerged in the computer industry, i.e., the cathode ray tube (CRT) and the liquid crystal display (LCD). CRT is a mature technology, while the LCD is a recent innovation [Table 1]. LCD monitor displays have the advantages of having a smaller footprint and of being perfectly flat, less heavy, thinner, and more adjustable [Figure 1]. One significant difference between the two is in the integration of the key steps of light generation and modulation. In LCD monitors, light generation and light modulation are physically separated, unlike in CRT monitors [Figure 2].[7] Currently, LCD monitors are preferred over CRT displays.[4]

Bottom Line: Monitor displays are an integral part of today's radiology work environment, attached to workstations, USG, CT/MRI consoles and PACS terminals.For each modality and method of use, the correct display monitor needs to be deployed.It helps to have a basic understanding of how monitors work and what are the issues involved in their selection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Monitor displays are an integral part of today's radiology work environment, attached to workstations, USG, CT/MRI consoles and PACS terminals. For each modality and method of use, the correct display monitor needs to be deployed. It helps to have a basic understanding of how monitors work and what are the issues involved in their selection.

No MeSH data available.