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Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteoma: How we do it.

Jankharia B, Burute N - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: There were no delayed complications.The average follow-up period was 12 months.Thus, our primary and secondary clinical success rates were 95 and 100%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiologists, Piramal Diagnostics - Jankharia Imaging.

ABSTRACT

Aims and objectives: To describe our technique for performing radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in osteoid osteoma and to evaluate the results of treatment.

Materials and methods: We evaluated 40 patients in whom RFA was performed for osteoid osteomas between October 2005 and February 2008. The lesions were located in the femur (n = 22), tibia (n = 10), humerus (n = 2), acetabulum (n = 2), radius (n = 1), fibula (n = 1), patella (n = 1), and calcaneum (n = 1). The procedure was performed using a standard technique.

Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients, with intranidal localization of the needle and complete ablation. All patients were fully weight bearing 2-3 h after the procedure. Successful pain relief was achieved in all patients within 48 h. Immediate complications included a case of minor thermal skin burn and a small cortical chip fracture, which healed on its own. There were no delayed complications. The average follow-up period was 12 months. Two patients (5% of cases) had recurrence of pain after intervals of 5 and 8 months, respectively, following the ablation; this was due to recurrence of the lesion. Complete pain relief was however achieved after a second ablation in both cases. Thus, our primary and secondary clinical success rates were 95 and 100%, respectively.

Conclusion: RFA is a safe, quick, minimally invasive, and extremely effective method for the management of osteoid osteomas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Osteoid osteoma. Plain radiograph shows a typical metadiaphyseal cortical osteoid osteoma involving the upper end of the femur. The nidus is well seen (black arrow) along with the surrounding cortical thickening (white arrow)
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Figure 0008: Osteoid osteoma. Plain radiograph shows a typical metadiaphyseal cortical osteoid osteoma involving the upper end of the femur. The nidus is well seen (black arrow) along with the surrounding cortical thickening (white arrow)

Mentions: Osteoid osteomas show a central circular or oval lucent nidus, with surrounding cortical and endosteal sclerosis. Subperiosteal and cortical tumors show considerable sclerosis, whereas endosteal tumors show a negligible amount. Sclerosis may be totally absent in subarticular and intracapsular tumors. Some of these lesions also exhibit a periosteal reaction. The size of the lesion (the nidus) usually varies from 0.5 to 2 cm [Figure 8].


Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for osteoid osteoma: How we do it.

Jankharia B, Burute N - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Osteoid osteoma. Plain radiograph shows a typical metadiaphyseal cortical osteoid osteoma involving the upper end of the femur. The nidus is well seen (black arrow) along with the surrounding cortical thickening (white arrow)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747406&req=5

Figure 0008: Osteoid osteoma. Plain radiograph shows a typical metadiaphyseal cortical osteoid osteoma involving the upper end of the femur. The nidus is well seen (black arrow) along with the surrounding cortical thickening (white arrow)
Mentions: Osteoid osteomas show a central circular or oval lucent nidus, with surrounding cortical and endosteal sclerosis. Subperiosteal and cortical tumors show considerable sclerosis, whereas endosteal tumors show a negligible amount. Sclerosis may be totally absent in subarticular and intracapsular tumors. Some of these lesions also exhibit a periosteal reaction. The size of the lesion (the nidus) usually varies from 0.5 to 2 cm [Figure 8].

Bottom Line: There were no delayed complications.The average follow-up period was 12 months.Thus, our primary and secondary clinical success rates were 95 and 100%, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Radiologists, Piramal Diagnostics - Jankharia Imaging.

ABSTRACT

Aims and objectives: To describe our technique for performing radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in osteoid osteoma and to evaluate the results of treatment.

Materials and methods: We evaluated 40 patients in whom RFA was performed for osteoid osteomas between October 2005 and February 2008. The lesions were located in the femur (n = 22), tibia (n = 10), humerus (n = 2), acetabulum (n = 2), radius (n = 1), fibula (n = 1), patella (n = 1), and calcaneum (n = 1). The procedure was performed using a standard technique.

Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients, with intranidal localization of the needle and complete ablation. All patients were fully weight bearing 2-3 h after the procedure. Successful pain relief was achieved in all patients within 48 h. Immediate complications included a case of minor thermal skin burn and a small cortical chip fracture, which healed on its own. There were no delayed complications. The average follow-up period was 12 months. Two patients (5% of cases) had recurrence of pain after intervals of 5 and 8 months, respectively, following the ablation; this was due to recurrence of the lesion. Complete pain relief was however achieved after a second ablation in both cases. Thus, our primary and secondary clinical success rates were 95 and 100%, respectively.

Conclusion: RFA is a safe, quick, minimally invasive, and extremely effective method for the management of osteoid osteomas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus