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Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A 60-year-old man with a pathologically proven intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Two consecutive oblique coronal MPR images (A,B) show a diffusely dilated pancreatic duct and a pleomorphic cystic lesion in the pancreatic head. This suggests communication between the cystic mass and the pancreatic duct. Navigator-triggered isotropic 3D RARE MRCP (C) definitely depicts a pleomorphic, multilobulated cystic mass with ductal communication (arrow), suggestive of a branch duct type intraductal papillary mucinous tumor
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Figure 0018: A 60-year-old man with a pathologically proven intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Two consecutive oblique coronal MPR images (A,B) show a diffusely dilated pancreatic duct and a pleomorphic cystic lesion in the pancreatic head. This suggests communication between the cystic mass and the pancreatic duct. Navigator-triggered isotropic 3D RARE MRCP (C) definitely depicts a pleomorphic, multilobulated cystic mass with ductal communication (arrow), suggestive of a branch duct type intraductal papillary mucinous tumor

Mentions: In a recent publication, Sahani et al,[29] have shown that MDCT combined with 2D curved reformation can provide imaging details similar to MRCP, in patients with IPMN and can show communication of the branch duct–type IPMN with the main pancreatic duct. According to Song et al, the diagnostic confidence with MRCP for evaluating the ductal communication of the cystic lesions in 25 patients (25/53, 47%) [Figure 18] with available 2D curved reformation images was higher than with MDCT and MPR images. So, even though MDCT using various postprocessing techniques provides detailed information on cystic structures[30], MRCP is still usually better than thin-section CT scans.[31]


Three-dimensional imaging for hepatobiliary and pancreatic diseases: Emphasis on clinical utility.

Kim SJ, Choi BI, Kim SH, Lee JY - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2009)

A 60-year-old man with a pathologically proven intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Two consecutive oblique coronal MPR images (A,B) show a diffusely dilated pancreatic duct and a pleomorphic cystic lesion in the pancreatic head. This suggests communication between the cystic mass and the pancreatic duct. Navigator-triggered isotropic 3D RARE MRCP (C) definitely depicts a pleomorphic, multilobulated cystic mass with ductal communication (arrow), suggestive of a branch duct type intraductal papillary mucinous tumor
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2747398&req=5

Figure 0018: A 60-year-old man with a pathologically proven intraductal papillary mucinous tumor of the pancreas. Two consecutive oblique coronal MPR images (A,B) show a diffusely dilated pancreatic duct and a pleomorphic cystic lesion in the pancreatic head. This suggests communication between the cystic mass and the pancreatic duct. Navigator-triggered isotropic 3D RARE MRCP (C) definitely depicts a pleomorphic, multilobulated cystic mass with ductal communication (arrow), suggestive of a branch duct type intraductal papillary mucinous tumor
Mentions: In a recent publication, Sahani et al,[29] have shown that MDCT combined with 2D curved reformation can provide imaging details similar to MRCP, in patients with IPMN and can show communication of the branch duct–type IPMN with the main pancreatic duct. According to Song et al, the diagnostic confidence with MRCP for evaluating the ductal communication of the cystic lesions in 25 patients (25/53, 47%) [Figure 18] with available 2D curved reformation images was higher than with MDCT and MPR images. So, even though MDCT using various postprocessing techniques provides detailed information on cystic structures[30], MRCP is still usually better than thin-section CT scans.[31]

Bottom Line: Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc.All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Three-dimensional (3D) imaging allows disease processes and anatomy to be better understood, both by radiologists as well as physicians and surgeons. 3D imaging can be performed with USG, CT scan and MRI, using different modes or rendering that include surface-shaded display, volume-based rendering, multiplanar imaging, etc. All these techniques are used variably depending on the indications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus